Page 9

BFI StatisticalYearBook_2014

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 2013 – the year in review – 9 understanding remains hampered by a lack of robust UK data. Some limited data are provided by Ofcom, but the UK market is being held back by the absence of data about subscribers and downloads, mode of access and audiences – information that benefits the industry in other markets such as Spain. The strength and depth of UK talent driving the industry was rewarded and showcased to the world at the leading international award ceremonies in 2013/14. UK films and talent won 26 major film awards in 2013/14, including six Oscars® and 13 BAFTAs, with Steve McQueen’s 12 Years a Slave winning the best film award at both ceremonies. This was the first time a film by a black director has won the best picture Oscar®. The success of Gravity gave deserved recognition to the UK special effects industry, as it won four BAFTAs and five Academy Awards®, including those for sound and visual effects. The awards for Gravity (whose visual effects were produced by the British company Framestore), reflect wider British talent and UK innovation in this area, as seen in the economic data. UK film, video and TV post-production turnover accounts for 22% of total film industry turnover, and has grown by 67% since 2008 to £1.6 billion. Changes to the UK cultural test for film which came into effect in April 2014 will further boost the special effects industry. The existing film tax relief plays a major role in attracting international productions to the UK and provides vital support for UK independent productions. The value of film production spend in the UK reached £1.1 billion in 2013, up from £994 million in 2012. Three quarters of UK production spend was associated with inward investment features, and sixteen big budget films accounted for 72% of this total, including Guardians of the Galaxy, Heart of the Sea and Jupiter Ascending. Expenditure on independent domestic UK films (such as Alan Partridge: Alpha Papa and Pride) also increased between 2012 and 2013, from £134 million to £150 million. In the first full year of the new tax reliefs for the screen industries (April 2013 – March 2014), the UK production spend of British qualifying highend television productions was £395 million and the UK spend of animation projects was £52 million, 52% of which was associated with inward investment. High-end television productions shot in 2013 included Game of Thrones 4, Outlander and 24: Live Another Day, while animations included Bing Bunny and PIP!. The success of these productions is likely to drive further growth, with the combined high-end television and animation UK production spend already worth 40% of the value of UK film production. In 2013, public investment in film for education, young people, and lifelong learning increased to £32 million (8% of all public funding for film), up from £20 million in 2012. Into Film, the new organisation aiming to make film an integrated part of education for 5-19 year olds, supported over 8,000 schools’ film clubs across the UK to screen and produce films, helping 282,000 children and young people to access film. Investment in film education and encouraging diversity will help develop talent and broaden the range of stories being told on the big screen. This in turn, is important to the success of initiatives aiming to develop and grow audiences for feature film. Attracting the best talent from across the whole of society will help the UK film industry to continue to thrive and compete on the world stage. Looking to 2015 we anticipate: • the turning point for the film video market, as the growth of on-demand services finally outpaces the decline of physical video • a strong year for production in our screen industries, with a further expected boost from the introduction of a new tax relief for video games • the impact of the recently published Creative Industries Strategy growing the creative economy, increasing exports and foreign investment. We hope you find this edition of the Yearbook a useful source of information and we welcome your feedback. (rsu@bfi.org.uk). Vivienne Avery, Nick Maine and Alex Tosta Research and Statistics Unit, British Film Institute UK production activity £1.1bn


BFI StatisticalYearBook_2014
To see the actual publication please follow the link above