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BFI StatisticalYearBook_2014

5.1 About specialised films The BFI considers most feature documentaries, subtitled foreign language films and re-releases of archive/classic films to be specialised. Other films that do not fall into these categories may also be considered as specialised. These films may be less easy to define as a particular genre or may deal with more complex and challenging subject matter than the majority of mainstream films. Many are from the independent production sector (although they may be handled by a mainstream, studio-based distributor) or are made with a low production budget (compared with a studio production). They may focus more on script and character rather than effects and star names and may be expected to appeal to a narrower audience segment than mainstream films. (Non-feature film releases such as recorded live performances are not considered to be specialised; they are categorised as event cinema. For more information, see Chapter 10.) In recent years some mainstream films which were originally made and shown in 2D, have been ‘rereleased’ in the 3D format. Examples include the original Toy Story (released in 3D in 2009), The Lion King (2011) and Beauty and the Beast, Star Wars: Episode 1 – The Phantom Menace and Titanic (all released in 3D in 2012). In previous editions of the Yearbook these have been considered as specialised films under the rerelease criterion. However, this year 3D re-issues of mainstream films have been treated as mainstream rather than specialised releases. Three such films were released in 2013: Finding Nemo, Jurassic Park and Monsters, Inc. These three films are not included as specialised in the present chapter. Also, in order to present a consistent time series, the 3D re-issues of mainstream films considered as specialised in previous editions of the Yearbook are not included in Figures 5.1, 5.2 and 5.3. 5.2 Specialised films at the UK box office in 2013 In total, 446 specialised films were released in 2013, representing 64% of the total number of UK theatrical releases in the year (Table 5.1). These films grossed £110 million, a 9.5% share of total box office earnings. However, documentaries (0.9%), foreign language films (2.2%) and re-releases (0.1%) took a very small share of UK box office revenues. Table 5.1 Specialised films in the UK and Republic of Ireland, 2013 Type 50 – BFI Statistical Yearbook 2014 Number of releases Share of releases (%) Gross box office (£ million) Share of gross box office (%) Average widest point of release Documentary 89 12.8 10.7 0.9 20 Foreign language 279 40.0 24.8 2.2 17 Re-release 42 6.0 1.3 0.1 19 Other specialised 70 10.0 73.5 6.4 121 All specialised films* 446 63.9 109.7 9.5 35 All films 698 100.0 1,153.7 100.0 108 Source: BFI RSU analysis of Rentrak data * Due to some overlap of categories (eg a film can be categorised as both foreign language and documentary) the total refers to the number of specialised films, not the sum total of the categories in the table. An analysis of specialised film releases and market share from 2001 to 2013 is shown in Figure 5.1. The proportion of specialised film releases increased steadily from 2003 to 2009 while their market share has remained at around 8% apart from three peak years in 2009, 2011 and 2012 when a small number of specialised titles crossed over to mainstream audiences.


BFI StatisticalYearBook_2014
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