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BFI StatisticalYearBook_2014

U PG 12A 15 18 Chapter 4: Genre and classification – 43 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 As Figure 4.3 shows, for all films and UK films the highest earning classification was ‘12A’ followed by ‘15’, but for UK independent films the ‘15’ classification earned slightly more than the ‘12A’ classification. For UK films nearly two thirds (64%) of the total box office came from ‘12A’ films. The top four UK films of 2013, Les Misérables, Gravity, Fast & Furious 6 and Thor: The Dark World, were all ‘12A’ films, and these four titles alone took 46% of the total box office for UK films. For all films the ‘12A’ classification took 46% of the box office, due mainly to the strong performance of the UK films mentioned above as well as The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug, Iron Man 3 and The Hunger Games: Catching Fire. For UK independent films the ‘15’ classification took 39% of the box office. Leading independent titles rated ‘15’ were Rush (the second highest grossing UK independent film of the year), I Give It a Year and Alan Partridge: Alpha Papa. Both all films and UK independent films earned a larger proportion of their overall box office from the ‘PG’ classification than UK films. High earning non-UK ‘PG’ films included Frozen and Wreck-It Ralph, and the top earning UK independent ‘PG’ film was Sunshine on Leith. The ‘U’ classification generated a much larger proportion of total box office for all films compared with UK films and UK independent films. ‘U’ rated releases included a number of high earning animated titles from the US majors including the top grossing film of the year, Despicable Me 2. Figure 4.3 Percentage of gross box office by BBFC film classification for all films, UK films and UK independent films, 2013 % of gross box office 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 All films 16.3 10.7 45.5 24.4 3.0 UK films 1.9 6.8 64.0 24.7 2.6 UK independent films 6.2 12.2 36.5 38.8 6.3 Source: Rentrak, BBFC, BFI RSU analysis Notes: Category ‘12A’ includes those films that were given the ‘12’ classification before 2003. The ‘12’ classification was superseded by ‘12A’ for films shown at the cinema in August 2002. The first film given a ‘12A’ rating was The Bourne Identity. Figures as at 23 February 2014. There has been some gradual change in the proportions of releases by classification over the last 13 years, as shown in Figure 4.4. The share of releases for the most common classification, ‘15’, has mainly been around 40%, and was 38% in 2013. The second and third most common classifications ‘PG’ and ‘12A’ have together accounted for over 40% of releases for most of the period. During that time, the slow decline in the ‘PG’ classification has been compensated by a rising trend in the ‘12A’ rating. The ‘U’ and ‘18’ classifications have consistently accounted for the smallest percentages of releases since 2001. In 2011 there were slightly more ‘U’ films released than ‘18’ films, but in all other years, more ‘18’ films than ‘U’ films have been released. In 2013 the proportion of ‘18’ releases was only slightly less than the proportion of ‘PG’ releases.


BFI StatisticalYearBook_2014
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