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Chapter 22: Employment in the film industry – 235 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 The proportion of self-employed workers in film and video production fluctuated in the range 45% to just over 60% between 2007 and 2013. In 2007 it was 45%, then increased each year to a peak of 62% in 2010. It then stayed at a similar level in 2011, before reducing to just over 45% in both 2012 and 2013. In comparison, only 14% of the total UK workforce was self-employed in the year to September 2013. Figure 22.2 Self-employed workers as proportion of total film and video production workforce, 2007-2013 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 % of total in employment Self-employed as % of total 46.3 50.0 59.8 61.9 61.3 45.7 45.4 Source: Office for National Statistics Labour Force Survey and Annual Population Survey Notes: Year means the year ending September. See note to Figure 22.1. 22.2 The gender of writers and directors of UK films Since 2007, we have been tracking the under-representation of women among screenwriters and directors of UK films. In 2013, we published a report Succès de plume? Female Screenwriters and Directors of UK Films, 2010-2012 which showed that although the numbers of female writers and directors of UK films released are consistently low, recently higher proportions of women have been associated with successful films (see link at end of chapter). Of the independent UK films released between 2010 and 2012, just 16% of the writers and 11% of the directors were women. However, for the top 20 UK independent films over the same period, women represented 37% of the writers and 18% of the directors. And for profitable UK independent films, 30% of the writers were women. Successful female writers and directors of independent UK films over this period include: Jane Goldman (The Woman in Black and Kick-Ass), Debbie Isitt (Nativity 2: Danger in the Manger), Phyllida Lloyd and Abi Morgan (The Iron Lady), Dania Pasquini and Jane English (StreetDance and StreetDance 2), and Lucinda Whiteley (Horrid Henry: The Movie). In addition to independent UK films, a number of female writers and directors had success over the same period working on UK-USA studio titles. Examples include: Jane Goldman (X-Men: First Class), Lone Scherfig (One Day), Sarah Smith (Arthur Christmas), Susanna White and Emma Thompson (Nanny McPhee and the Big Bang). In 2013, of the 155 identified writers of UK films released during the year, 22 (14%) were women (Table 22.3).


BFI StatisticalYearBook_2014
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