Page 175

BFI StatisticalYearBook_2014

Chapter 16: Film education – 175 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 Table 16.6 Higher education students in the subject area media studies, 2003-2013 Year Media studies Film studies Film production All media studies related courses 2003/04 20,215 1,490 135 26,135 2004/05 20,200 1,840 165 26,495 2005/06 19,785 2,155 420 26,665 2006/07 18,995 2,540 545 27,010 2007/08 17,860 3,610 520 28,085 2008/09 17,595 3,815 530 28,245 2009/10 19,190 4,250 680 30,815 2010/11 19,690 4,500 675 31,480 2011/12 19,745 4,600 930 31,860 2012/13 15,780 4,570 1,040 28,260 % change 2011/12-2012/13 -20.1 -0.7 11.8 -11.3 % change 2003/04-2012/13 -21.9 206.7 670.4 8.1 Source: Higher Education Statistics Agency Notes: Copyright Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA) Limited 2013. HESA cannot accept responsibility for any inferences or conclusions derived from the data by third parties. Figures have been rounded to the nearest multiple of 5. Includes first degree, post-graduate and other degrees. Media studies related courses include media, film, television, radio, electronic and print-based media studies courses. Many of the media and film related higher education courses have been accredited by Creative Skillset, the UK-wide strategic skills body for the creative industries, as high quality and offering relevant industry skills. Overall, 94 accredited degrees and diplomas were offered by 37 academic institutions in 2013/14, including the network of Creative Skillset film academies: London Film School, National Film and Television School, and Screen Academy Scotland, which had 173, 170 and 59 students respectively. These academies have been identified by the UK film industry as centres of excellence in film education and training. 16.3 Film education as a progression route Learning about film can be enhanced by practical involvement in filmmaking. In addition to the development of critical, creative and cultural skills, gaining filmmaking experience, particularly at an early age, can be a key stepping stone to the development of a career in the film industry. In 2012, the BFI launched the BFI Film Academy programme, supported now by the Department for Education in England, National Lottery, Creative Scotland and Northern Ireland Screen, which was designed to help 16-19 year olds develop their skills and build careers in the film industry. Over its first two years the Academy has provided opportunities for talented young people from a range of backgrounds to learn about all aspects of filmmaking - from writing and direction to editing and sound design – through network (evening and weekend) and residential programmes. Courses were delivered through partner organisations across the UK and with industry bodies like BAFTA, Creative Skillset and Pinewood Studios. In 2013/14 the Academy worked with 39 delivery partners reaching 720 young people on network courses (Table 16.7) and a further 100 young people on residential courses. Across all courses in 2013/14, 31% of participants were from Black and minority ethnic backgrounds and 9% were disabled.


BFI StatisticalYearBook_2014
To see the actual publication please follow the link above