Page 170

BFI StatisticalYearBook_2014

16.1 Learning about and through film Film education takes place in both formal and informal settings, from schools and colleges to voluntary interest groups like youth clubs and film societies. Film is a rich and versatile medium for exploring subjects in the classroom and elsewhere, as well as a worthwhile and rewarding object of study in its own right. It has the same educational value as the printed text, and that film should be integrated into all forms of education, learning, training, cultural appreciation and understanding. This chapter presents the most up-to-date record of film education related data currently available, beginning with a look at activity in formal education settings. 16.2 Film education in formal education settings In practice, film education activity has traditionally involved watching and listening to a range of film texts, discussing and analysing them; generating discursive and written work, storyboards and scripts; making films and re-purposing archive material. Outside of dedicated film and media studies courses, film is increasingly used in other parts of the curriculum, such as Science, English or modern languages. 2013 saw the creation of Into Film, a charity focused on making film an integrated part of education for 5-19 year olds. It builds on the legacy of FILMCLUB and First Light, providers of film education and filmmaking opportunities for children and young people. Supported by the BFI and a range of other funders, Into Film represents one of the largest ever investments in film education for the formal sector and is intended to ‘create a critical shift from film education work around the school to work within the classroom’1. This is done primarily through providing educational resources to support the curriculum: incorporating film-based resources into lessons and providing resources for watching, making and learning about film within the network of existing schools’ film clubs. In 2013/14, Into Film trained and enabled 1,963 teaching professionals and youth leaders to work with film across the curriculum (including film studies), and 39,239 sets of educational resources were downloaded. Within the supported film clubs, 254 films were made over the year and a total of 5,082 children and young people participated in filmmaking activities. (As 2013 was a transition year, the data presented covers both FILMCLUB and Into Film activities. First Light activities for 2012/13 are included within Into Film activities.) Since the launch of Into Film, the number of film clubs in each of the nations and regions has increased (with the exception of the Isle of Man). The total number of film clubs has risen by over 14% from 7,037 clubs in 2012/13 to 8,056 clubs in 2013/14. The reach of the film clubs has also increased, from 232,000 pupils in 2012/13 to 281,960 pupils in 2013/14. The national/regional distribution of FILMCLUB and Into Film schools are shown in Figures 16.1 and 16.2. 1 Impact, Relevance and Excellence: a new stage for film education, BFI 2014 170 – BFI Statistical Yearbook 2014


BFI StatisticalYearBook_2014
To see the actual publication please follow the link above