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BFI StatisticalYearBook_2014

Chapter 12: Video on Demand – 135 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 Comparing Table 12.1 and Figure 12.3 implies that the available data do not always provide a consistent picture of online film consumption. Looking at leading providers, there are differences between industry estimates of revenue and user surveys of the services accessed. YouTube is the most used provider, but as it provides film and video for free it does not appear in the list of top providers by revenue. Amazon also does not appear in this list, but is one of the most used providers. The differences may be due to the business model that is employed by the provider, pricing and willingness to pay for downloading or streaming films, and self-perception of downloading or streaming. 12.4 Audience for on-demand film People can now watch film on demand wherever they are, as long as there is a 3G/4G hotspot or wireless router to connect their (mobile) devices to the web. By the beginning of 2014, 84% of adults in the UK had access to the internet at home, and 53% of adults used a mobile phone to connect to the web. In addition, 35% of households had a tablet or similar device, of which around half were 3G/4G enabled for mobile internet access. It is possible to gauge the potential audience for film on VoD content. In terms of television-based VoD providers, by the end of March 2014 approximately, 10.5 million Sky satellite subscribers, 3.8 million Virgin Media TV subscribers, 917,000 TalkTalk TV subscribers and 900,000 BT TV subscribers were able to access a range of on-demand services, including pay-per-view and catch up services. The potential audience for television-based VoD in the UK was estimated to be over 16 million. Research commissioned by Ofcom has provided new information on the online consumption habits of the UK population, which in the absence of data on top performing film titles, can provide an impression of viewers buying habits. The current analysis compares data for the first and fourth waves of its Online Copyright Infringement Tracker study, which covered the three-month periods April-June 2012 and March-May 2013. This gives a proxy for a yearly comparison between 2012 and 2013. In the first period, April-June 2012, 19% of internet users aged 12 or over had downloaded or streamed film content, while in March-May 2013, 18% of internet users had done so (Table 12.2). According to Ofcom, 27% of internet users aged 12 or over had downloaded or streamed film content at some time between 2012 and 2013. The median number of films downloaded or streamed online in March-May 2013 was five, up from two in April-June 2012.


BFI StatisticalYearBook_2014
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