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JUNE/JULY 2013 Miniature Horse World 89 Sunburn Solutions By Montague N. Saulez, BVSc, MRCVS, MS, PhD, Dipl. ACVIM Q Questions & Answers Questions & Answers A Ash Creek Farm clough@pldi.net Clough, Ron and Kim Kingfisher, OK 73750 405-375-5217 www.sunrae.com/ashcreekfarm Black Thunder Farms blackthunderfarms@yahoo.com Black, John Broken Arrow, OK 74014 Chimera Ranch Chimeraranch@hughes.net Accountius, Jack and Pat 580-380-2413 Durant, OK 74701 Crosswinds Farm jhorneval@aol.com Horn, Jerry & Anna 405-707-7143 www.sunrae.com/crosswindsfarm Stillwater, OK 74075 Fingland Stables patty@finglandminiatures.com Fingland, Patty and Bill 918-779-5676 www.finglandstables.com Broken Arrow, OK 74014 Fireball Miniatures aqha4t@tds.net Terry, Donna & Cox, Jennifer jtcminiatures@gmail.com 405-590-7844 Choctaw, OK 73020 www.fireballminiatures.com L & J Minis Miniature Horse Farm ljminis@pixiys.net Navrat, Lisa & Joe 620-837-5623 www.ljminis.com Walton, KS 67151 Little M Ranch littlemranch@aol.com Mc Sperrit, Velta 405-382-3504 Seminole, OK 74868 Poco de Oro Miniatures pcproctor@hotmail.com Proctor, Pat 501-413-0207 www.pocodeorominiatures.com Lonoke, AR 72086 Redrock Miniature Horse Farm redrock@swbell.net Schulz, Becky 405-478-7638 www.sunrae.com/ redrockminiaturehorses Reflections a miniature horse farm reflectionsfarm01@att.net Lupton, Frank & Charlotte 405-771-3996 www.sunrae.com/reflections Oklahoma City, OK 73151 Rocking M Farm okpigeon@yahoo.com Roberson, Bob & Vickie 405-323-7010 www.rockingmfarm.com Chandler, OK 74834 Rohr Miniature Horses afrohr@upperspace.net Rohr, Freda 918-342-4878 www.rohrminiaturehorse.com Claremore, OK 74018 Sweet Dreams Miniature Horse Farm sweetdreamsminiturehorsefarm@ yahoo.com Warden, Mark 405-262-6121 El Reno, OK 73036 T-Town Miniatures judik@olp.net Krehbiel, Tony & Judi 918-366-4119 www.ttownminis.com Bixby, OK 74008 Tea Cup Stables okminihorse@aol.com Bouska, Wilma & David 405-834-8225 www.teacupstable.com Chandler, OK 74834 Wee Okie Farm weeokiefarm@aol.com Jenkins, Rita & Hugh 405-373-2523 Yukon, OK 73099 www.weeokiefarm.com 2013 SHOW DATeS: April 6, 2013 Fat and Fuzzy April 26,27,28 2013 AMHA and AMHR Chickasha, OK May 18,19 2013 AMHA Show Stillwater, OK June 28,29,30 2013 AMHA and AMHR Chickasha, OK Nov 2, 2013 Fall Clinic and Show Visit the website for more details: www.omhci.org President – Wilma Bouska Vice President – Robin Crane Secretary – Donna Terry Treasurer – Ron Clough My neighbor has a major problem with sunburn on her appaloosa mare. She is basically a black mare with spots on her rump, but not on a true blanket, as such, yet her sunburn is really nasty. It is pink and inflamed, and we have not really been able to find anything that would help it. What do you recommend to help it heal? She is now in a pen that is completely roofed, rather than out on the pasture, but we need to get this healed. I’m sure everyone has great sympathy for your neighbor’s horse since they have probably suffered from sunburn and its consequences! It is typically painful and causes blisters, which then lead to dry and cracked skin with hair loss. All light-colored horses, and those with white markings, have the potential to develop sunburn when the skin is exposed to light. This can include colors such as appaloosas, cremellos and pintos. Photodynamic agents are responsible for transferring energy from the light into body cells, causing damage. These can include a variety of pharmaceutical agents (such as tetracyclines) and plants (St. John’s Wort, buckwheat, and perennial rye-grass). Alfalfa or clover might induce similar symptoms. Plants containing pyrrolizidine alkaloids (ragwort, tarweed, rattle-weed, and salvation jane) might cause photosensitivity in horses with liver disease. Solutions include decreasing sun exposure (as you have done), especially during the warmest period (noon to 5:00 p.m.). Liberal use of brightly colored, water-resistant sunscreen (SPF of greater than 30) that you will be able to see from a distance whether it has been rubbed off, grooming products that contain sunscreen, a sunscreen-soaked flysheet, and having your local veterinarian perform a good physical examination and perform some blood tests to check for a liver disorder are plausible options. Have a walk through your pastures and try to identify any offending plant. In consultation with your vet, a course of antibiotics/ corticosteroids might assist in reducing the degree of infection and inflammation. Vitamin E gel is great to use on affected areas and might also help soothe them. In the long term, horses that are chronically exposed to harsh sunlight might be at risk for skin cancer, also called squamous cell carcinoma. Courtesy of theHorse.com


Miniature_Horse_World_JuneJuly
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