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The Nordic Cook Book

in history, together with the continuous seizure of each other’s lands, created a cultural afnity. But when the two remaining major powers in the Nordic area in the late 1600s, Denmark and Sweden, divided the Nordic area between them, the Scandinavian mountain range created two independent halves of a common idea and shared history which was to infuence the following centuries. One can therefore describe the Nordic food culture as having west Nordic and east Nordic counterparts. In the west Nordic part, Denmark and Danish culture were the norm. In the eastern Nordic part Sweden and Finland shared a cultural community. The kingdom of Denmark had also comprised Norway (which left the Danish Kingdom in 1814 to be a part of Sweden until 1905 when it became an independent kingdom) and Iceland (which became a republic independent from Denmark in 1944). Even today, the Faroe Islands and Greenland are autonomous areas within the Danish Kingdom, which thus is a major north European cultural community, at least in terms of area. The eastern part of the Nordic countries has been characterized by Sweden and the Swedish political culture. Finland was an integral part of the kingdom of Sweden–Finland from the Middle Ages to the 1800s. Sweden lost Finland to the Russians in 1809 and it ended up under Russian rule until it became an independent republic in 1917. Large parts of the Baltic region were also under Swedish rule further back in time. Both the western and eastern Nordic food cultures are characterized by an exchange of ideas throughout the history of the Holy Roman Empire but were also infuenced by France, the Netherlands and the UK. Since the early 1800s, the US has been a signifcant culinary cultural inspiration from which to retrieve both dishes and seasonings,


The Nordic Cook Book
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