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The Nordic Cook Book

COARSE POTATO PANCAKES Raggmunk / Lufsa / Råriven pannkaka (Sweden) These pancakes can either be fried in a pan on the stove – when they are known as raggmunk – or baked in the oven, when they are called lufsa or råriven pannkaka. Either way, serve them with slices of Fried Salt Pork (page 302) and Sugared Lingonberries (page 692). Preparation and cooking time: 1 hour Makes: 20 pancakes 600 g/1 lb 5 oz potatoes ½ quantity Thin Pancake batter (page 450) made with 3 eggs butter, for frying salt, to taste Peel and grate the potatoes coarsely on an ordinary box grater. Use your hands to squeeze them tightly so as to remove any excess liquid. Transfer to a bowl and stir in the pancake batter. Season with salt, to taste. To fry them in a pan, preheat the oven to 120ºC/ 235ºF/Gas Mark ½. Melt some butter in a frying pan over a medium heat. Add a good amount of batter to make a large pancake that covers the bottom of the pan, or dollop in spoonfuls to make several smaller ones (which I prefer). Either way, fatten the mixture with the back of your spoon so that you don’t have a mound of potato sitting in a pool of batter. Fry until the underside is deeply golden, then fip over and fry the other side. Don’t rush these pancakes as they have to cook all the way through to be tasty. Keep them warm in the oven while you fry the remaining pancakes. Alternatively, to bake them in the oven, preheat the oven to 200ºC/400ºF/Gas Mark 6. Melt some butter in a roasting pan. Pour in the pancake batter and return the pan to the oven. Bake until the pancake is cooked all the way through. For image see opposite page POTATO PATTIES Potatisbullar (Sweden) When I grew up, potatisbullar were always made from riced potatoes, or sometimes from leftover mashed potatoes. Today though, there are so many commercial varieties of potatisbullar around that most people think of them as being made with grated potatoes. A sort of mix between the real potato ball and a råraka or Coarse Potato Cake (page 118). When I make the authentic version at home, my kids are always disappointed – not because they aren’t tasty, but because from their point of view, my way (the old way), is not correct. Preparation and cooking time: 30 minutes Serves: 4 800 g/1¾ lb foury boiled potatoes, peeled, riced and left to cool a little 2 eggs 50 ml/2 f oz (3½ tablespoons) milk 50 g/2½ oz (1 cup plus 1 tablespoon) plain (all-purpose) four butter, for frying salt and white pepper, to taste Combine the potatoes, eggs and milk in a bowl and sift over the four. Mix everything together well, but not for too long (the longer you work it the frmer and denser the balls will become). Shape the mixture into little patties. Butter a pan and fry the patties over a medium–high heat until they are golden on both sides. Don’t hurry. They need to caramelize properly and heat all the way through to cook the four. If you want, you can fry your potato patties in multiple pans, but if you only have one pan, then you can fry them in batches and keep them warm in an oven preheated to 120ºC/235ºF/Gas Mark ½. For image see opposite page


The Nordic Cook Book
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