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Innovative Health Care Magazine

13 InnovativeHealthMag.com But, back to McLaren’s Trauma Room in our scenario... let us picture McLaren hospitals across Michigan. Soon after arrival in the McLaren Emergency Department, a TV monitor is wheeled in next to the bed, facing the patient. A doctor who is a specialist in interventional neurology appears on the screen, having been paged to answer a Stroke Alert. “Hi! I am Dr. Majjhoo, the stroke specialist on call. We are concerned that you are having a stroke. We’re going to run some tests, and I am going to examine you.” What follows is a remarkable story of innovative health treatment; breakthrough technology, and modern medicine. If it seems like something of a miracle, that’s only because it is something of a modern miracle. Specifically, in McLaren’s case, there is the convergence of a sense of mission, a dedicated team of specialists, and utilization of telestroke technology. Dr. Aniel Majjhoo is Medical Director of the McLaren Neuroscience Program. A soft-spoken, confident doctor, you find it easy to believe he heads this remarkable program. He is board certified in Neurology, Vascular Neurology, Neurological Critical Care, and Interventional Neurology. He trained at Wayne State under Dr. Andrew Xavier, whom he reveres as a mentor, and who is also part of the McLaren Stroke Network. The other two interventional neurology specialists are Dr. Bharath Naravetla, who serves as Telestroke Medical Director, and Dr. Mahmoud Rayes. Dr. Xavier, Dr. Naravetla and Dr. Rayes are all board certified in neurointensive care and are fellowship trained in interventional neurology. Rounding out the team of specialists is Dr. Gregory Norris, a neuro intensivist who is board certified in neurology and neurocritical care. Almost 800,000 Americans have strokes each year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. McLaren’s sense of mission derives from the recognition that timely intervention and treatment can limit the damage from these brain attacks. Stroke remains the fifth leading cause of death in the U.S., and the number one cause of long-term disability. McLaren Health Care recently launched its telemedicine service that provides patients across the McLaren system with enhanced in-house stroke care and 24/7 access to highly specialized interventional neurologists who can provide advanced therapies for patients with strokes and aneurysms. The McLaren Stroke Network is the only program in the country where every stroke patient is seen by a stroke-trained interventional neurologist in minutes, any time of the day or night. The McLaren Stroke Network allows these specialists to provide acute care on a timely basis for patients at participating hospitals throughout the network during the critical period following onset You are in the Emergency Room at McLaren Flint, just inside the entrance – the Trauma Room. It is like many ERs in the country, but special because your loved one has suffered what appears to be a stroke. Suddenly this place is very special to you. Many of us have been in ERs, for ourselves or with friends or family. SPECIFICALLY, IN MCLAREN’S CASE, THERE IS THE CONVERGENCE OF A SENSE OF MISSION, A DEDICATED TEAM OF SPECIALISTS, AND UTILIZATION OF TECHNOLOGY. TV MONITORS? YES, OF COURSE. BUT HOW ABOUT ROBOTICS? Nurses dart about, tending to a hundred things. Behind the desk, as they do uncountable times a day, staff members talk patiently on phones, calming an emotional caller, or transmitting important information. “Metallic” voices pierce the atmosphere every 30 seconds, paging someone or issuing coded alerts. Every once in a while, a gurney with someone atop, races past you or around a corner. EMS personnel rush in; nurses with clip boards and meds rush by; curtains are slid shut. In the midst of all, you keep focus on your friend or relative – or yourself, in this scenario – and things partially are blocked out: blood, moans, alarm. Emergencies indeed. But some emergencies don’t seem as traumatic; some are quieter, seem less dramatic, are not accompanied by moans, cries, and bandages. But they are emergencies. Life-threatening. Dangerous. In these emergencies, minutes count. Oftentimes these emergencies are in the category of strokes. The silent killers, frightening because of their unknown aspects, causes, and ultimate effects. All too common in America, touching almost every family or extended family.


Innovative Health Care Magazine
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