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Innovative Health Care Magazine

WATER CRISIS The Community agencies: Edible Flint; Fair Food Network; Genesee County Community Action Resource Department (GCCARD); and the Hurley Foundation. Foundation President Kathi Horton announced $523,664 in grant funding, advised from the Flint Child Health and Development Fund, and the Healthy Food and Safe Water Fund. A $167,000 grant was awarded to GCCARD for an expansion of the Meet Up, Eat Up summer meal program to an expanded number of Flint sites, and to establish year- ’round sites for weekend meals. The purpose is to increase child and family access to high quality, nutritious meals that will reduce the long term effects of lead poisoning. About 1,300 Flint children and youth, ages 2-18 and their families, will be provided with access to breakfast, lunch, snack and dinner meals through the Meet Up, Eat Up Youth Meal program. Food sites will be located in the areas of Flint that contain high concentrations of children in low-income families. GCCARD will expand the program from 22 meal sites to at least 35 sites. The Hurley Foundation will receive $96,000 110 Foundation of Greater Flint (CFGF) is helping remediate the Flint water crisis by issuing grants to the following local groups and Innovative Health - Summer 2016 for expansion of two programs – the Nurse Family Partnership (NFP) and Healthy Cooking Demonstrations. A $74,000 grant will expand the evidenced-based NFP, a community health program that provides early health and developmental interventions to mothers and children. Each mother is partnered with a registered nurse and receives ongoing nurse home visits that continue through her child’s second birthday. Goals of the program are to improve the well-being of infants and reduce the behavioral impacts of lead exposure. A $22,000 grant supports cooking demonstrations and nutrition education to Flint families to lessen the effects of lead exposure. Hurley staff, in collaboration with other partners, will provide 100 cooking demonstrations at the Flint Farmers Market, Flint schools, and community locations. Recipes will include foods high in iron, calcium and vitamin C – all known to limit the effects of lead exposure. An estimated 2,000 individuals and families will be served by this program. Participants will receive nutrition resources, recipes, fresh produce, and healthy snacks. The GCCARD and Hurley Foundation grants were made from the Flint Child Health and Development Fund, also known as flintkids.org. Edible Flint’s “Enabling Healthy Choices” program was awarded a $60,664 grant to support the organization’s work in growing and having access to healthy food. Edible Flint has a Demonstration Garden located across from Hurley Medical Center at Fifth and Begole Streets. Last year the garden produced 1,795 pounds of produce that was given away to volunteers and neighborhood residents. Other services offered include the Food Garden Tour, Garden Starter Kits, and Garden Starter Services, all designed to teach Flint residents successfully how to garden at a low cost during the growing season. Another program expansion that will provide greater access to healthy foods is the Fair Food Network’s Double-Up Food Bucks program. A $200,000 grant was awarded to support the expansion of access to fruit and vegetable consumption in Flint. Healthy food is essential to mitigate the effects of lead, especially in children. The project is designed to support Double Up Food Bucks usage at the Flint Farmers Market, and to increase A $167,000 GRANT WAS AWARDED TO GCCARD FOR AN EXPANSION OF THE MEET UP, EAT UP SUMMER MEAL PROGRAM TO AN EXPANDED NUMBER OF FLINT SITES, AND TO ESTABLISH YEAR- ’ROUND SITES FOR WEEKEND MEALS. access and redemptions at two more stores; allow recipients to spend on any produce (not just Michigan grown); incorporate specific dairy products high in calcium; and improve technology. Grants to Edible Flint and the Fair Food Network were awarded from the Healthy Food and Safe Water Fund. This Fund was established in December 2015 through a grant from the Michigan Health Endowment Fund (MHEF). In March, A $250,000 grant was announced to support the water testing work being conducted by Dr. Marc Edwards, through funds received from the MHEF and the Charles Stewart Mott Foundation. For more information or to apply for a grant: CFGF, www.flintkids.org 810-767-8270


Innovative Health Care Magazine
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