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PRESIDENT’S LETTER Sid Chapman, GAE President What does it mean to lead? In today’s society, we’re inundated with varied definitions of leadership and are exposed to countless sensationalized instances of when those in position fail to lead. Nevertheless, when it comes to our chosen profession as educators, we are called upon to lead every day. From ensuring the safe transport of children to school to administering the day-to-day activities of an entire school district, it takes more than just effective management skills to successfully touch and enrich the lives of the students we serve. Given that we as educators are natural-born leaders in our daily dealings, what does it take to lead the leaders? Everyday a special group of educators personify the collective passion of what it means to foster the future. Program heads, assistant principals, principals, and various levels of superintendents straddle a rather precarious fence between academia and bureaucracy. As impassioned educators, they see the crucial needs that must be met for their fellow educators and students. As administrators, these leaders are required to carry out the rules and regulations set forth by government officials. I can imagine that at times administrators may feel as if they are composing and performing a symphony for a tone-deaf audience. The vast majority of administrators began their respective educational careers in the classroom, and if asked if they miss teaching, their response would be a resounding and emphatic “Yes!” Understanding how the vital educational process works, we as educators always endeavor to put students first. Witnessing the “ah-ha” moment for a student who struggles with a subject is what we as educators relish. Trading the everyday direct impact with a group of students to make a greater, albeit indirect, impact on a larger group of scholars, administrators answer the call to lead the leaders in an official capacity. Leaders face the challenges of public education head on without complaint. These salient individuals hold their respective schools together despite years of gargantuan austerity cuts. They take the brunt of community backlash when enforced education legislation proves less than successful. They help disillusioned educators make it through another year, even if they themselves can’t see a silver lining in the current state of education. Why? In spite of the harsh nature of our reality, education leaders are committed to fulfill their charge of creating and sustaining an environment conducive to learning. 4 | KNOW • Volume 13 Issue 3 Better than any legislator, education leaders can tell you the solutions to the daunting issues facing their students and their fellow educators. Not being short on creativity, local education leaders figure out how to make the ends meet for their schools. They lead by example and manage with conviction, passion, and resolve. Yet some want local leaders to be replaced by people less committed to fighting for the best interest of students, trivializing the true essence of the burden of educational leadership. As we broach the juncture of another General Assembly here in Georgia, I urge every education leader, whether you lead as a crossing guard or as an administrator, to stand up and be heard. It will be up to us to show and explain what it means to lead your local schools to excellence. Support those who’ve answered the call to lead the leaders and ensure that the fate of our society’s future rests in the hands of administrators who are driven by a passion for public education. Sincerely, Dr. Sid Chapman President Georgia Association of Educators Before being elected GAE President, Sid served as GAE Vice President (2010-2012, 2012-2014), Board Director and member of the GAE Internal Concerns and Elections and Credentials Committees. He also served in his local association, the Clayton County Education Association (CCEA), as president (2002-2014). THE CHOICE IS YOURS. We offer your KNOW magazine in both a print format and a digital format. The digital magazine comes straight to your email box. It gives you access to more information, cool news, and lots of bonus features-from “live” ads to video. It puts all that and more just a few clicks away. Or if you prefer, you can sign up to receive the old-fashioned KNOW magazine. To have the magazine sent to you, login at GAE.org, click on your PROFILE, and choose your preferred delivery method for the magazine. www.gae.org | 1 The Constitutional Amendment Vote 7 Teach + Travel the world. We’ll show you how. 9 Stop bullying on your bus now! 12 Review: The Code of Ethics for Educators 20 Get ready to vote! 27 Do you have the right to say anything on your blog? 29 Meet the GAE Leading Locals 31 Want to save $$$? There’s an app for that! EDUCATION’S FRONTLINE the people • the politics • the profession WHAT’S @ STAKE IN OUR STATE www.gae.org | 1 EDUCATION’S FRONTLINE the people • the politics • the profession 3 GAE’s 44th Annual Spring Convention 8 Are you ready for Read Across America 2014? 10 Valdosta member wins BIG wrongful termination settlement 12 Legal Q & A tackles gender stereotyping 16 GAE Elections and Candidates 18 0 Days GAE’s Initiative Our effort to provide Georgia’s children the TIME they need to be their best! Spring 2014 Volume 12 • Issue 1 Notice to GAE Members: Georgia Association of Educators annual membership dues include the following refundable contributions: Georgia Association of Educators Foundation - $2 for Active Certified members and $1 for Active Education Support members. GAE Foundation contributions fund educational scholarships and grants to members and potential educators and are tax deductible as charitable contributions. Georgia Association of Educators-Fund for Public Education (GAE-FPE) - $6 for Active Certified members and $3 for Active Education Support members. GAE-FPE contributions are used for political purposes and are not tax deductible. GAE Foundation and GAE-FPE contributions are voluntary and members have the right to a refund of these contributions. Send your request for refund of GAE Foundation and/or GAE-FPE contributions in writing to GAE Membership Processing at the address shown: GAE Membership Processing; Suite 500; 100 Crescent Centre Parkway; Tucker; Georgia 30084-7050 NEA, GAE, and local association membership dues are not deductible as charitable contributions. Dues payment (or a portion) may be deductible as a miscellaneous itemized deduction. Six percent (6%) of GAE membership dues is attributable to lobbying expenses and is not tax deductible.


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