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The Concrete Times April 2015

The CONCRETE Times • APR 2015 monthly columnist - jay shilstone 14 producer. A small producer can be agile and purchase raw materials in small quantities that wouldn’t be attractive to a large producer, thus allowing more flexibility in the use of materials. If the producer does a good job, then 5 trucks become 10, then 20 and then 50. One plant becomes 2, then 5, then 10. On the other hand, a small producer with 5 trucks can’t afford the money and effort to build a multi-million dollar research facility like the multinational firms can. The small producer must rely on his materials suppliers and maybe a local lab for technical assistance. The small producer becomes a trucker who just happens to produce concrete. Cement and strength overdesign factors are increased to make up for the fact that less attention is being paid to the day-to-day characteristics of the concrete. Variability of strength and other characteristics will probably increase as well. Now, let’s rewind our clocks in America. It is the 1920’s and the 1930’s, and the ready mix concrete industry is developing, people are building batch plants, usually based on the minimum requirements to make concrete. Batch plants have one bin for sand and one or two bins for stone. Now World War II comes around and concrete production is channeled into building up the military-industrial complex to feed the war effort. No time to slow down. The war is over and GI Joe comes home to Rosie the Riveter and they start to make houses and babies. Still no time to slow down. More batch plants and more concrete. The 1950s come and concrete producers are building more plants and making more concrete the way they have always done it. Eisenhower is starting the Interstate Highway system. Life is good. Build more batch plants and make more concrete. Materials are plentiful. The infrastructure is ready to make more of the batch plants that they have always made, with two or three aggregate bins and one silo for cement. The producers are trucking out as much concrete as they can produce. We expand through the 1960s and 1970s, paying attention to important things like “strength” and “slump”. We don’t look back until the late 1970s and early 1980s. HTC SUPERFLOOR™ MORE THAN JUST POLISHED CONCRETE IT’S CONCRETE LOVE Is it possible to love a grey and cold concrete floor? Just give concrete a chance and you will find a strong and beautiful flooring material. HTC Superfloor™ is a revolutionary grinding and polishing concept which is also a good environmental choice. You will discover a shining, easily maintained super strong floor. You will find a treasure that was always hidden and has just been waiting to be refined. HTC Superfloor™ is a floor worthy of love. Yes, it is possible to love a concrete floor. www.htc-floorsystems.com HTC Floor Systems Ltd. Phone +44 (0) 845 460 2500 E-mail info@htc-europe.co.uk


The Concrete Times April 2015
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