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The Concrete Times April 2015

The CONCRETE Times THE NEWS FROM THE INDUSTRY & The UK CONCRETE SHOW 2015 • Volume 2 • Issue 4 • April 2015 • LONDON’S BRUTALIST CONCRETE ARCHITECTURE • WHY DON’T WE USE MORE CONCRETE IN PAVING APPLICATIONS?• TOM FISHBURNE CARTOONs • FROM THE EDITOR • JAY SHILSTONE on concrete•post UKCS2015 show news from uzin and conspare THE END OF TRADITIONAL CEMENT? NEW CO2 CURED CONCRETE TO BE MARKETED WORLDWIDE BY LAFARGE CLAIMS TO REDUCE CARBON FOOTPRINT OF CEMENT BY 70% REACHING FULL STRENGTH IN JUST 24 HOURS! These new processes for producing sustainable cement and concrete reduce carbon emissions by up to 70% and recycle 60-100% of the water used in the production of concrete products. Patented by New Jersey, USA, based Solidia Technologies, with further patents pending in more thn 100 countries worldwide, this potentially revolutionary cement is produced with a non-hydraulic, lower-energy and lower-emission chemistry. Solidia Cement™, claims the company, is more sustainable than Ordinary Portland cement (OPC) and cures with CO₂ instead of water. It performs better due to reduced drying shrinkage increasing strength, is more durable and therefore more cost-effective than traditional concretes. Remarkably, it can fully cure in just 24 hours, allowing the early stripping of forms therefore increasing speed of construction and potential for huge reductions in cost. For over 50 years, scientists have tried to cure concrete with CO₂, knowing the resulting product would be stronger and more durable but, says the company, they are the first to produce a concrete of this type that is truly commercially viable. The strength and durability of the CO₂ cured concrete has been verified according to ASTM and AASHTO specifications by the CTLGroup, formerly the R&D laboratory of the USA’s Portland Cement Association. The new processes promise to save time, money, water and energy with the technology easily extending to a wide variety of concrete formulations, production methods and specifications. The initial technology focused on unreinforced precast applications, including paviours and blocks but now commercial processes are being developed for reinforced applications, including aerated concrete, railway ties, architectural panels and hollow core extrusions. LONDON’S ‘BRUTALIST’ CONCRETe ARCHITECTURE - Page 6


The Concrete Times April 2015
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