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The Concrete Times 2017-08.pdf

The CONCRETE Times ŭTVNNFS 5SBOTJUJPOJOH$PODSFUFUP7JSUVBM%FTJHO BOE$POTUSVDUJPO+":4)*-450/&%*4$644&4 Ja James M. “Jay” Shilstone, Jr. is the third generation of Shilstones to be involved in concrete quality control. A Fellow of the American Concrete Institute, Jay has been widely recognised as an expert in concrete quality control around the world and he is also a member of the American Society of Testing and Materials and the National Ready Mixed Concrete Association. He has been in the concrete industry for almost 40 years, with over 30 of those years involved in concrete quality control software. Jay works for Command Alkon, Inc. and is their technical specialist in the COMMANDqc quality control software program. A compelling writer, Jay is also a keen blogger and his blogsite on www. commandalkonconnect.com gets over 1000 hits per week. Last summer in the U.S. a change was made to ASTM C94, “Standard Specifi cation for Ready-Mixed Concrete”, that removed the requirement that concrete delivery tickets be “written, printed or stamped”. This opened the door for the use of electronic concrete delivery tickets, just like UPS and FedEx have used for over a decade. Finally, one of the last paper items that has thwarted the goal of the “paperless project” for BIM, Building Information Modeling, and e-Construction, for the paving industry, could be converted to its electronic equivalent. However, both during the ASTM balloting process and during e-ticket implementation, we were forced to ask ourselves, “When is a concrete delivery ticket not a concrete delivery ticket?” While ASTM C94 very closely defi nes the delivery ticket, its content and the parties who exchange it, in reality the way tickets are used is not standardized. For example, the delivery ticket is meant to be an exchange between the concrete producer and his customer, usually the concrete contractor, but it is often passed around to the laboratory technician, the pump truck operator, the Building Code Offi cial or any number of people who have an interest in the contents of the truck. This is very easy to do with a paper ticket, but not so easy to do with an electronic ticket unless the process is defi ned and implemented in the electronic delivery system. This gets into a very interesting topic: product vs. process. As a BIM-outsider, BIM appears to be based on products – the actual documents that are converted to an electronic format. This includes design drawings, structural design calculations, material take-off s and the like. E-Construction, on the other hand, seems to focus on processes – transmitting submittals and responding to RFIs (requests for information). Obviously, both initiatives have to address product and process, but they each seem to come from a diff erent perspective. Callout: “Neurotics build castles in the sky. Psychotics live in them. Psychiatrists collect the rent. – Multiple attributions.” This leads us to another facet of this topic. One might easily conclude that architects are like neurotics. They both build castles in sky, although the architect’s “sky” is actually “paper” or the “virtual world”. In either case, the castle is an idea and not reality. Some might argue that contractors are worse than psychotics. They don’t have to live in the castle, they actually have to build it. Those contractors that have tried to build some of the more imaginative designs know just how crazy that is. However, with the spread of BIM, contractors are increasingly being pushed to move 53"/4*5*0/*/($0/$3&5&+":4)*-450/& © Courtesy of Command Alkon


The Concrete Times 2017-08.pdf
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