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Open up society

Method – How to do: Line and bar charts Figures 1.3 and 1.4 show a line chart and a bar chart. Line charts and bar charts are both good methods to illustrate distribution, differences and development over time between certain categories. Figure 1.3, for example, shows Danish fathers’ share of parental leave compared with fathers in other Scandinavian countries, calculated as a percentage. A table gives an overview of large numbers, but it is always a good idea to illustrate one’s data in a line or bar chart because such charts make it easier to identify patterns and trends. Figure 1.3 Fathers’ share of parental leave days as a percentage in the Nordic countries 40 35 30 25 20 15 10 5 0 Danmark Finland Island Norge Sverige 1996 1998 2000 2002 2004 2006 2008 2010 2012 2014 16 CHAPTER 1 When reading a line or bar chart, pay attention to: „„ The chart’s headline – what is the chart showing? „„ Units and division on the x axis „„ Units and division on the y axis „„ What can you read in the chart? „„ Are there any notes attached to the bar/ line chart – and what do they say? Note: Recorded data on parental leave from 2014 is the latest aggregate data in Denmark and the Nordic countries. Source: Statistics Denmark. compared with the early 1960s. This means that social patterns and gender roles can change because they are created by those people who participate in the social life. Or, to put it another way: The social patterns are created through the social relations that exist between people. In this case it is about equality between women and men. are different from those that apply today. It is also important to emphasise that the differences that we see between men and women in today’s Danish society differ radically from the conditions women were offered just 50-75 years ago. Women’s participation rate in the labour market (the proportion of working women in the 16-65 age group) has exploded


Open up society
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