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Open up society

Method – How to do: How to read a table When reading a table, note the following: „„ What does the table show? Look at the title (see for example Tables 1.1 and 1.2, page 14). „„ Tables introduce us to numbers, or what is also called 'hard data'. The numbers can either be absolute, i.e. concrete numbers (raw data) such as how many people (number) live in Denmark, or how many people commit property crime (number). But tables often represent SOCIAL STUDIES AND GENDER EQUALITY 13 relative numbers, i.e. processed numbers such as percentages or indexation. For example: What proportion of women and men, respectively, take the child's first sick day. Thus, when working with tables it is important to note whether the table refers to absolute or relative numbers. „„ Equally important is it to look for the unit of measurement, i.e. whether the table uses Danish kroner, percentages, etc. „„ When looking at a table, you must pay attention to the factors included in the table's first column and main column. That is because the two columns often represent different contexts. „„ How is the table designed? Should it be read vertically or horizontally? „„ It is important to read the table systematically – can you identify a certain pattern or key trends? „„ Formulate a conclusion based on your analysis of the table. that men make the most repairs and women generally provide laundry in the Danish homes. A clearer pattern appears if we involve more factors. We will discover, for ex- ample, that women do most of the housecleaning and cooking; and if we ask the Danes how the domestic work is distributed in their own home, they will say that women do more domestic work than men. Even the men say so. Women also take the clear majority of child’s first sick day. Actually, women take 2 out of 3 sick days for the children, and we must look to the larger Danish cities to find a more equitable distribution of the child’s first sick day between mum and dad. Women also take most of the parental leave. Only about 29% of Danish men took parts of the parental leave in 2014. Parental leave is an interesting subject in relation to equality between women and men in Denmark, because the two genders are entitled to the same amount of leave. Despite this, the statistics show it is primarily women who take leave in connection with child birth. There may be several reasons. Among other reasons, society clearly expects the woman to take the bulk of the leave – in line with expectations, traditions and the view of the woman as the main caregiver. Even at the end of the 2010s, men still do not meet the same expectations and requirements. This may make it more difficult for the man to ask for paternity leave


Open up society
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