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Bisbees Conservation Journal Q2 2015

For many of our species, particularly the harem-structured hoofstock species (antelope, white rhinos and giraffe), it makes the most sense to swap males amongst zoos and private institutions and keep our female herd largely the same—often holding females that have been born here back for 70 BISBEE’S CONSERVATION JOURNAL Q2 • 2015 our herd’s sustainability into the future, thus necessitating the move of their father to avoid inbreeding. Moving animals can be very expensive and it has risks and challenges— both to the animals and to those making the moves, so we attempt to be very strategic in which animals we move and when we move them. Rotating males has proven to be a very effective management technique for Fossil Rim and other breeding centers (such as those within the Conservation Centers for Species Survival C2S2 and within the Source Population Alliance under the umbrella of C2S2) in order to maintain genetic variability.


Bisbees Conservation Journal Q2 2015
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