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Bisbees Conservation Journal Q2 2015

our students. It has provided opportunities for students in so many areas. The course provides an excellent option for all students to obtain a PE credit, but for us it has proven to be much more than a PE credit. As a byproduct of the course, we have started three different clubs that continue to grow in interest. The Archery, Competitive Shooting, and Fishing clubs have become extremely popular for students in our district. Students from middle school to seniors have found a niche that gives them a place to belong. The vision of providing a safe and productive activity for our students that had nowhere to go after school has turned into a State Championship Archery Team for our school. Our students can be found in the Archery Arena practicing from early in the morning and well after the final bell. Students have been committed to practice, but what I see more as an administrator is parents of the middle school students excited about their students’ involvement resulting in a willingness to bring them to early morning practice which allows themselves to be involved in ways they hadn’t had in the past. The students are committed to building strong teams that continue to grow and include all levels of students. All the barriers have disappeared when they are together. Our program has grown to over 600 students participating in the Outdoor Adventures courses each year, after only being in existence for three years.  The key to the success of our program begins with an excellent educator that is committed to the well-rounded success of all of our students regardless of their economic standing or rank in their class.”   Jill Stafford Principal Lowery Freshman Center 972-396-6975 I have seen firsthand how this OA creates new hunters, archers and anglers. I taught OA at Argyle High School, Argyle, TX. One day my principal called and asked if I would take a senior student from a traditional P.E class. I agreed since he had to have the P.E. credit to graduate and he was not “interacting” well with his freshman classmates. When he walked into my class, he slammed the door, said a few choice words about the principal, the school and even me. I welcomed him to Outdoor Adventures. He was a “Gothic” young man with long black hair, wearing all black and black painted finger nails. He was from a single parent family and had never experienced outdoor activities. When we started our Angler Education unit, his attitude quickly changed. The school had a retention pond and we were able to fish during the OA class. He grasped the whole concept and couldn’t wait to get to OA. One Monday morning he barged into my class and announced, “Guess where I went this weekend?” He had purchased a rod/reel and went fishing in all of the local ponds and private lakes, trespassing in every one of them. While I could not condone the trespassing, I was excited for him. I kept up with him throughout his college days and he continues to enjoy fishing today. I have seen young men and women aspire to become wildlife biologists or Game Wardens. I have seen hundreds of students catch their first fish. Parents have told me they are taking their child hunting or fishing or just camping following the OA course. In conclusion, OA is available to any secondary school; it is aligned to the educational standards; targets unfamiliar, yet very excited youth and is supported by school administrators and parents. With continued growth, the OA program will be in every state. With an average of 100 students per school enrolled in the course, there will be 1000 schools reaching 100,000 students per year in the near future. Thousands of students will learn new skills to be enjoyed for a lifetime. OA promotes an educated youth and a wellinformed future consumer and voter. While every student may not become a hunter, we know they will be taught the truth about the role of the hunter and the angler in wildlife conservation. Thanks to Bisbee’s Fish and Wildlife Fund generous donations the past three years, thousands of students have been and will be introduced to hunting, fishing and archery in our public schools. The DEF is a501 C 3 organization. Our biggest supporter is the Dallas Safari Club. We have numerous donors and supporters; however, the challenge, demand and need is great. The DEF supports college scholarships and has funded a long history of wildlife conservation projects. The DEF’s goal and mission is to get OA in every state across the country. In 2015, the DEF announced at the DSC Annual Convention in January, the Wildlife Heritage Society’s Charter Member program. The Wildlife Heritage Society is the DEF’s Endowment Fund. The DEF was blessed to receive 10 new Charter Members during the convention. Each new member committed to $100,000 each to the endowment. With our million dollar endowment, the DEF is poised to expand our mission. Throughout the 2015 Charter Member campaign, the DEF is activity seeking new $100,000.00 commitments. Please visit our website, www. dallasecologicalfoundation.org and look under the education tab watch a few of our videos about OA. If you are interested being donor to support our mission, you can donate directly through our website. If you want to contribute to automated monthly or annual donation, you can create your own donation profile. If you would like to learn more about our WHS Charter Member program or the DEF mission, please contact me at any time. DEF – Ensuring the Legacy of Hunting and Fishing by changing the youth today for tomorrow’s conservation leaders. Scot McClure, DEF Coordinator Dallas Ecological Foundation 13709 Gamma Rd., Dallas, TX 75244 940-465-0366 scot@dallasecologicalfoundation.org 26 BISBEE’S CONSERVATION JOURNAL Q2 • 2015


Bisbees Conservation Journal Q2 2015
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