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LFF 17_ Brochure high res

SHEIKH JACKSON AL SHEIKH JACKSON UNTITLED 86 JOURNEY FRI 13 SUN 15 18:15 HAYMARKET 15:30 CINÉ LUMIÈRE WED 11 FRI 13 21:10 ICA 15:15 VUE5 SAT 14 SUN 15 20:30 VUE7 15:30 PCC * BSL In 2013, Austrian documentary filmmaker Michael Glawogger set out with a small crew to film various locations areound the world. The plan was to shoot for a year and be open to situations as they arose – to work without any predetermined theme and free from expectations. It would be a self-professed film ‘about nothing’. But some months later, while in Liberia, Glawogger died from malaria. Co-directed by his regular collaborator Monika Willi, Untitled completes this project. It combines some of Glawogger’s footage with extracts from a diary, read by Fiona Shaw, that he kept during the production. Switching between Africa, the Balkans and Italy, this absorbing and visually striking essay film always returns to concerns central to Glawogger’s previous work. In particular, the backbreaking – and largely unchronicled – nature of labour in the developing world. Imbued with Glawogger’s fierce compassion and searching lyricism, this is – partly through tragic circumstance – a haunting summation of a remarkable director’s work. Ed Lawrenson Dir Michael Glawogger, Monika Willi. Prod Tommy Pridnig, Peter Wirthensohn. Scr Michael Glawogger, Attila Boa, Monika Willi. Austria-Germany 2017. 107min. Sales Autlook Filmsales DOC Dir-Prod-Scr Marc J Francis, Max Pugh. With Thich Nhat Hanh, Benedict Cumberbatch. UK 2017. 88min. UK Distibution Thunderbird Releasing Slow down and breathe. This contemplative journey follows in the steps of Zen master Thich Nhat Hanh and is a rare insight into life within a monastic community. The sun rises. Everything is calm and still. Life is beautifully serene as Benedict Cumberbatch’s composed, meditative voice reads an extract from Thich Nhat Hanh’s early journals. So begins Max Pugh and Marc J Francis’ (Black Gold, LFF2006) fascinating and immersive exploration of what it means to devote one’s life to mindfulness. With unprecedented access to the famous secluded monastery of Plum Village in the South West of France, Walk With Me captures the daily routine and rituals of monks and nuns on a quest to develop a deep sense of presence. It is an insightful rumination on the pursuit of happiness, living in the present and our attachment to material things – a welcome remedy to the stresses of city life and a world in turmoil. Laure Bonville WALK WITH ME DOC Dir Tupaq Felber. Prod Tupaq Felber, Samantha Chitty, Emilie Jouffroy, Kamilla Kristiane Hodøl. Scr Tupaq Felber, Jon Foster, Robyn Isaac, Simon Meacock, Jamie Zubairi. UK 2017. 95min. Prod Co Independent Content Four thirtysomethings find some much-needed time to reconnect in this beautifully observed and subtly insightful debut. On a balmy English summer afternoon, Zooby and Jon set aboard the canal boat they have hired for the weekend. Collecting friends Red and Simon along the way, the foursome bask in each other’s company, laughing, catching up and getting drunk. But while the opportune break provides a welcome respite from the responsibilities of daily life, Jon appears distant and introspective, hinting at a personal tragedy that the others are hesitant to address. Taking place almost entirely in the tight confines of the narrowboat, Tupaq Felber’s agile first feature is a work of striking intimacy, filled with subtle observations and quiet insight. With the striking black and white photography lending a subtle sense of the cinematic and uniformly excellent performances from the small cast, this naturalistic drama is a heartfelt testament to the power of friendship. Michael Blyth TIDES Egyptian director Amr Salama continues to mine a rich vein of filmmaking with Sheikh Jackson, a winning parable about a preacher with a secret passion for the king of pop. Sheikh Jackson is a bittersweet and poignant tale of an Islamist preacher experiencing a crisis of faith following the death of singer Michael Jackson. With an unexpected air of Proustian longing, the pop icon’s passing pushes the hardline theologian to return to his past and confront youthful experiences. A series of flashbacks retrace his journey from a love-struck teenager through to his eventual conversion to the ultra-conservative Salafist strain of Islam that frowns on music, moonwalking and probably bejeweled white gloves. Salama previously tackled potentially ‘hot potato’ subjects such as AIDS and sectarianism in Egyptian society with the warm-hearted, emotionally generous Asmaa and Excuse My French. Here he takes on religious extremism with great success, serving up another likely audience favourite. Ali Jaafar Dir Amr Salama. Prod Mohamed Hefzy, Hani Osama. Scr Omar Khaled, Amr Salama. With Ahmad Alfishawy, Ahmed Malek, Maged El Kedwany. Egypt 2017. 93 min. Sales Media Luna BRITISH BRITISH THU 5* SAT 7 THU 12 21:00 SOHO 12:15 MAYFAIR 15:15 VUE5 Support Film Forever bfi.org.uk/join


LFF 17_ Brochure high res
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