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LFF 17_ Brochure high res

THE DRUMMER AND THE KEEPER 82 JOURNEY EQUILIBRIUM L’EQUILIBRIO SAT 7 SUN 8 15:15 ICA 13:00 CINÉ LUMIÈRE WED 11 THU 12 20:45 SOHO 18:30 RICH MIX THU 5 FRI 6 21:00 MAYFAIR 12:30 NFT1 MON 9 TUE 10 18:15 MAYFAIR 14:15 NFT1 Dir-Scr Ahmad Ghossein, Lucie La Chimia, Shirin AbuShaqra, Manuel Maria Perrone, Una Gunjak, Rami Kodeih, Mounia Akl, Neto Villalobos. Prod Myriam Sassine,  Georges Schoucair, Dominique Welinski . Lebanon-France 2017. 70min. Prod Co Abbout Productions Dir Mohamed Jabarah Al-Daradji. Prod Isabelle Stead, Mohamed Jabarah Al-Daradji. Scr Isabelle Stead, Mohamed Jabarah Al-Daradji. UK-Iraq-France- Qatar-Netherlands 2017. 82 min. Sales PictureTree International Dir-Scr Vincenzo Marra. Prod Luigi Musini, Olivia Musini, Cesare Apolito, Renato Ragosta. With Mimmo Borrelli, Astrid Meloni,  Roberto Del Gaudio. Italy 2017. 83min. Sales Intramovies Dir-Scr Nick Kelly. Prod Kate McColgan. With Dermot Murphy, Jacob McCarthy, Charlie Kelly. Ireland 2017. 92min. UK Distribution STUDIOCANAL Iraqi filmmaker Mohamed Al-Daradji’s The Journey is a taut, thought-provoking thriller that tackles what might just be the final moments of a potential suicide bomber’s life. Since the appearance of his 2006 feature debut Ahlaam (Dreams), Mohammed Al Daradji has become the filmmaker laureate of his beloved and beleaguered Iraq. With The Journey, he may have made his most complete and powerful film yet. The story follows Sara, a young Iraqi woman, as she enters Baghdad Central Station with a massive bomb strapped to her back. We see her hand clutching a detonator. It is shaking. From that tantalising set-up, Al Daradji fashions a relentlessly tense yet emotionally generous journey through a cross-section of Iraqi society. In a series of encounters, Sara meets her potential victims. Each exchange makes life the more compelling choice, yet still we see Sara struggle against the weight of her own indoctrination, leading to an unforgettable climax. Ali Jaafar A kaleidoscopic view of Lebanon, the Arab world’s most endlessly fascinating and infuriating country, as seen through the eyes of eight directors and four compelling short films. Lebanon is a tapestry, a mosaic of religions and spheres of influence, its representatives all attempting to co-habit while competing for control over a country even its own citizens have compared in size and deadliness to a scorpion’s genitals. As such, Lebanon Factory, a portmanteau collection of four short films from eight Lebanese directors, is a fitting snapshot of life in a country as defined by its natural beauty and irresistible human spirit as it is its seemingly intrinsic dysfunction. The four stories range between the tale of a Lebanese man pretending to be a Syrian migrant in order to smuggle his way into Europe and an octopus’ unfortunate encounter with an intrepid swimmer, and pretty much everything in between. Together, they reflect the multiplicity of voices and characters in this boisterous, bustling country. Ali Jaafar Alongside the anti-depressants that are slowing indie drummer Gabriel down, his unconventional therapist prescribes a healthy dose of Sunday football. A nonchalant dude who would rather be setting fire to things or fantasising about a pop star turning up to his gigs, Gabriel doesn’t exactly throw himself into his new regimen. But an encounter with teenage goalkeeper Christopher, who’s ostracised from his own family due to his Asperger syndrome, is going to significantly change Gabriel’s life whether he likes it or not. Former musician Nick Kelly, directing his feature debut, brings an authenticity to the dynamics of indie band life, skilfully drawing out the film’s humour. A warm, witty and sensitive film about an unusual friendship, it presents mental health and developmental disabilities in a fresh and wholly relatable way. Kate Taylor This superbly rendered and utterly believable contemporary morality tale focuses on a stubborn, principled priest in a poor Naples parish who battles a local Camorra clan. Dissatisfied with life in Rome, an idealistic priest transfers back to his home in Naples, to work in an impoverished and Mafia-infested parish. In attempting to help the local population survive the grim hardships of daily life, he comes up against the local Mafia kingpin. Matters intensify as he investigates an accusation that one of the gangsters is sexually abusing a child. Vincenzo Marra’s gripping drama is reminiscent – in a very good way – of the socially concerned gangster dramas produced by Warner Bros. in the 1930s that featured James Cagney and Pat O’Brien. But Equilibrium is no starry melodrama. It has a gritty, realistic atmosphere replete with impressively authentic performances from its largely non-professional cast. Adrian Wootton THE JOURNEY LEBANON FACTORY See something different player.bfi.org.uk


LFF 17_ Brochure high res
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