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LFF 17_ Brochure high res

BRITISH THU 5 FRI 6 15:15 NFT3 18:10 SOHO THE CLIMB Dir Michael Woodward. Prod Kelly Broad, Mike Morrison, Paul Harry Thomas. UK-USA 2017. 92min. Sales The Works International Sales How far would you go to save the Arctic? For six women, it saw them scale the 310 vertiginous metres of The Shard. In 2013, Greenpeace made headlines around the world by staging one of their most daring protests. An all-female team illegally ascended The Shard, Europe’s tallest building, which towers over the Thames. Emanating from different countries, none of the women were professional climbers. What they shared was a sense of outrage at petroleum giant Shell’s plans to drill for oil in the Arctic. In his debut feature, Michael Woodward employs behindthe scenes footage detailing the preparations, combined with personal interviews and contemporary newsreel to capture the experiences of the six (extra)ordinary women who volunteered for this perilous climb. They speak with candour and humour about their reasons for the protest and what kept them going in order to undertake this mission to save an essential part of our planet. Christine Bardsley BIRDS ARE SINGING IN KIGALI PTAKI ŚPIEWAJĄ W KIGALI 54 IN ASSOCIATION WITH DEBATE THU 5 FRI 6 18:15 RICH MIX 15:30 NFT2 THU 12 FRI 13 20:45 ICA 14:45 VUE7 FRI 6 TUE 10 20:45 VUE7 18:30 RICH MIX Dir Peter Bratt. Prod Brian Benson, Peter Bratt, Carlos Santana. Scr Peter Bratt, Jessica Congdon. USA 2016. 96min. Sales Roco Dir-Scr Everardo González. Prod Roberto Garza, Inna Payán. Mexico 2017. 74min. Sales Films Boutique The Mexican drug war is seen from a new angle in this gripping film that finds victims and perpetrators confronting us with their nightmarish stories. In the past five years, this barbaric war has claimed a staggering 100,000 lives. Where violence has become normalised, corruption endemic and life so cheap that it can be ended for ten dollars, everyone in Mexican society is affected – citizens, gang members, police and military. Everardo González reveals this horror through the vivid testimony of eye-witnesses wearing surgical masks to protect their identities; the nameless figures use their anonymity to speak directly and with shattering candour. The interviews are filmed in stark, dimly lit rooms. The storytellers remain faceless, but the depth of emotion emanating from their eyes feels like a window directly into the soul of the Mexican people. The intimacy of these environments adds immeasurably to the power of this devastating, minimalist film. Christine Bardsley Who is Dolores Huerta? Possibly the most important American activist you’ve never heard of. Until now, that is, thanks to Peter Bratt’s energetic and engaging documentary. Alongside better-known activist César Chavez, Dolores founded and led the first farm workers’ union, completely transforming the US labour scene. But like so many strong women who dare to challenge the establishment, she was attacked on grounds of her gender and ethnicity. Even as she worked tirelessly to empower a generation of immigrant workers to stand up for their rights, she was undermined and side-lined by unfair and untrue allegations regarding her private life and personal conduct as a Latina woman, wife and mother. Impressively blending a wealth of archive footage and interviews with Dolores and her contemporaries, Bratt sets the record straight, defining her place, and recording her remarkable achievements, within the context of the civil rights movement in America. Christine Bardsley DEVIL’S FREEDOM DOLORES LA LIBERTAD DEL DIABLO DOC Dir-Scr Joanna Kos-Krauze, Krzysztof Krauze. Prod Joanna Kos-Krauze. With Jowita Budnik, Eliane Umuhire, Wirold Wielinski. Poland 2017. 113min. Prod Co Kos Film Reeling with the psychological impact of the Rwandan genocide, Polish ornithologist Anna and her Tutsi friend Claudine embark on creating a new life. Claudine, the daughter of Anna’s colleague and a victim of the genocide, is accepted as a refugee by the Polish authorities. From there, the film deals with the parallel but differing effects of trauma. Underlying themes are gradually revealed, with the use of flashback and voiceover adding a powerful metaphorical context. Avoiding explicit accounts of the atrocities, the film’s exploration of ‘white’ and ‘black’ realities also exposes the bureaucratic and frequently inhuman obstacles faced by refugees. Their intertwined lives eventually find Anna and Claudine returning to Rwanda in search of the graves of Claudine’s lost relatives, and perhaps some resolution. Directed by Johanna Kos-Krauze and Krzysztof Krauze, there are powerful performances by Jowita Budnik (who starred in the directors’ earlier Papusza) and Eliana Umahire. Peter Hames DOC DOC


LFF 17_ Brochure high res
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