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LFF 17_ Brochure high res

SAT 14 SUN 15 18:00 CINÉ LUMIÈRE 13:00 RICH MIX CLOSE-KNIT KARERA GA HONKI DE AMU TOKI WA 46 LOVE MON 9 TUE 10 20:45 MAYFAIR 18:00 VUE7 SUN 8 MON 9 18:15 NFT2 14:45 VUE7 FRI 6 SAT 7 MON 9 21:00 HAYMARKET 21:00 HACKNEY 12:00 VUE7 Dir-Scr Alex Ross Perry. Prod Adam Piotrowicz, Alex Ross Perry, Christos V Konstantakopoulos. With Chloë Sevigny, Adam Horovitz, Emily Browning. USA 2017. 94min. Prod Co Nineties Roamer LLC Dir-Prod-Scr Henrik Martin Dahlsbakken. With Benjamin Helstad, Ingar Helge Gimle, Iben Akerlie. Norway 2017. 80min. Sales LevelK Aps Dir-Scr Maïte Alberdi. Prod Maïte Alberdi, Denis Vaslin, Fleur Knopperts, Sebastián Brahm.  Chile-Netherlands- France 2016. 82min.  Sales CAT&Docs Articulate, affluent and attractive, the central characters in Alex Ross Perry’s ensemble drama are held back by a gnawing dissatisfaction. Drily cynical Gwendolyn (Mary-Louise Parker) hires her archivist brother-in-law Nick (Beastie Boys’ Adam Horovitz) to catalogue the papers of her famous father. Nick then hires attractive assistant Naomi (Emily Browning) to spend the summer with him in a small room. Nick’s wife Alyssa (Chloë Sevigny), an insecure therapist, is less than pleased. And Naomi has her own plans, mainly involving the married Buddy (Jason Schwartzman). Perry’s previous films (including Listen Up Philip and Queen of Earth) have established his talent for finely-tuned, emotionally-wrought writing, with sharp humour and relationship observations that often sear gloriously close-to-the bone. With Golden Exits, we also get gorgeous metallic Super16 cinematography from Sean Price Williams and a series of acidic moments – particularly between two sets of co-dependent sisters – that truly sizzle. Kate Taylor One of the freshest new voices in Norwegian cinema, Henrik Martin Dahlsbakken delivers a sweetly delicious, heart-warming and wildly alternative road movie. Glorious fun-filled memories and bittersweet reminiscences pepper this offbeat celebration of life and love. Would-be music teacher Kasper lost his beloved mother Irene some months ago. Before she passed away she implored him to ‘do something fun with Dad’, but Kasper and his rather unconventional father Georg have since struggled to connect. A surprise call to the west coast of Norway offers an opportunity to revitalise their relationship. Campfires, breakdowns, old flames, a man in tights, women with tights on their heads… it’s not going to be a regular road trip. Outstanding writing and direction by Dahlsbakken, together with powerful performances and a great soundtrack, highlight both the humour and poignancy in finding new life and love in the shadow of sadness. Sarah Lutton A tender and bittersweet portrait of Chileans Anita and Andres, who have Down’s syndrome and are very much in love. They have been attending a school for people with Down’s syndrome for most of their lives, working in the bakery there, where they have been taught to become ‘responsible’ adults. Despite demonstrating independence and maturity, they soon realise that talk of marriage raises limits they are not supposed to cross. Documentary filmmaker Maïte Alberdi (Tea Time LFF2014) sensitively builds an intimate and respectful account of the daily joys, longing and frustrations of these older adults. With a sharp eye for composition and a good dose of humour, she highlights the divide between the protective environs of the school and the outside world, raising the difficult question of responsibility regarding people with Down’s syndrome. Above all,  The Grown-Ups is a moving story of love against all odds.  Laure Bonville THE GROWN-UPS LOS NIÑOS GOLDEN EXITS GOING WEST RETT VEST DOC Knitting is catharsis for Rinko, a transwoman whose maternal feelings are stirred by the arrival of her boyfriend’s 11-year-old niece, Tomo. Abandoned by her mum, resilient Tomo is used to fending for herself and now Rinko (played by heartthrob Toma Ikuta) must gain the trust of the insecure little girl. Those seeking Western gender politics or a sassy trans heroine are in for something different here. Although Rinko’s knitting patterns do have a subversive streak, her feminine values are more aligned with genteel passivity and familial subservience. So, it is within this traditional family drama framework that Naoko Ogigami beautifully teases out so many subtle and moving surprises, from the pleasure that Rinko takes in drinking beer, to the power of love communicated through a bento box and the true meaning of all those knitted blobs. A quietly subversive and emotionally rich film to treasure. Kate Taylor Dir-Scr Naoko Ogigami. Prod Noriaki Takagi, Masashi Igarashi, Kenzo Ishiguro. With Toma Ikuta, Rinka Kakihara, Kenta Kiritani. Japan 2017. 127min. Sales Nikkatsu Corporation See something different player.bfi.org.uk


LFF 17_ Brochure high res
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