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LFF 17_ Brochure high res

41 FACES PLACES GRAY HOUSE VISAGES, VILLAGES SAT 7 SUN 8 20:45 NFT1 12:30 VUE5 FRI 13 SAT 14 SUN 15 18:15 CENTRAL 18:15 HAYMARKET 21:00 NFT3 SAT 7 SUN 8 18:30 ICA 15:45 NFT2 THU 12 FRI 13 18:15 MAYFAIR 15:20 NFT1 Arriving in town in a van that doubles up as a giant camera, Agnès Varda and JR make quite an impression. For all the initial odd-couple thrills of seeing the revered French filmmaker rolling her eyes at the younger artist’s exuberance, a deep connection is quickly forged between two creative souls, who are fuelled by the desire to see their imaginations realised on a grand scale. Photographing people at home or work and pasting the huge images in public spaces, the pair use this art practice as a pretext to listen to working class French people reflect upon their lives. Deceptively simple in structure, the film’s socialist feminist politics are expertly folded into a moving humanism, exemplified in a moment where JR recreates the world as viewed through Varda’s blurring vision. And the film’s final act? A pilgrimage to visit old friend and notorious recluse – Jean-Luc Godard. Kate Taylor Dir-Scr Agnès Varda, JR. Prod Rosalie Varda. France 2017. 89min. UK Distributor Curzon Artificial Eye Dir-Scr Brett Morgen. Prod Brett Morgen, Bryan Burk, James Smith, Tony Gerber. With Jane Goodall. USA 2017. 90min. Prod Co National Geographic Studios Dir Lucy Cohen. Prod Julia Nottingham. UK 2017. 109min. UK Distribution Netflix This dazzling mix of straight documentary and striking visual art makes for a strangely beautiful cinematic experience. Could it be a portrait of alienated America? You don’t want to know too much about director Austin Lynch and photographer Matthew Booth’s compelling first film before seeing it. It’s a visceral piece, better experienced than described. But here are just a few teasing threads: Denis Lavant (Claire Denis and Leos Carax’s darling actor) opens the film as a lone fisherman on a Texan river. The film then progresses across different spaces, alternating between contemplative sequences and direct interviews. Oil-rig workers and women sentenced to life in prison share their experience on solitude and isolation, while the camera hauntingly lingers on architecture and the stark beauty of nature. Alvin Lucier’s eerie score pulsates and hypnotises. Gray House impresses with its unique cinematic vision, and Lynch and Booth are two major new talents to watch. Laure Bonville Dir Austin Lynch, Matthew Booth. Prod Joe Graham- Felsen, Elda Bravo, Sabrina S Sutherland, Jeremy Alter, Austin Lynch. Scr Austin Lynch. With Denis Lavant, Dianna Molzan, Aurore Clément.  USA 2017. 76min. Prod Co Beechvibes This fascinating and deeply moving documentary about famous primatologist Jane Goodall reveals never-seenbefore footage of her early work in Africa. In 1964, 26-year-old Goodall travelled to Tanzania on the first-ever mission to study chimpanzees in the wild. The primatologist’s subsequent decades in Gombe would open an unprecedented window into the lives of our close relatives. Acclaimed documentary filmmaker Brett Morgen (Cobain: Montage of Heck) had privileged access to more than 100 hours of previously unseen footage from that period, filmed by Goodall’s future husband, the wildlife photographer Hugo van Lawick. Jane is an intimate and affecting insight into Goodall’s personal journey as a scientist, but also as a woman and a mother. You’ll experience her discoveries and thrills, witnessing how nature and the animals she loved had a profound impact upon her life. Philip Glass’ grandiose score completes this truly luminous portrait. Laure Bonville How does a family deal with the memories of a traumatic event? It’s a question examined with great sensitivity in this moving documentary. In her quietly watchful debut, British director Lucy Cohen impresses with a delicate, but powerfully effective exploration of grief, identity and family bonds. For over two years, Cohen filmed a mother and her seven children – six young women and a young man, whose father killed himself, leaving them in financial ruin. Incorporating archive footage of the family and evocatively capturing the West Midlands landscape around them, Kingdom of Us is a record of the siblings’ emotional recovery as they piece together their broken past and reflect on their fears and aspirations for the future. Cohen’s film possesses a luminous quality, highlighting the power of youth and resilience, as the family travel along the rocky road towards hope. Laure Bonville JANE KINGDOM OF US DOCUMENTARY COMPETITION DOC DOC DOC DOC BRITISH


LFF 17_ Brochure high res
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