Page 40

LFF 17_ Brochure high res

DOC * BSL CHAUKA, PLEASE TELL US THE TIME DISTANT CONSTELLATION EX LIBRIS – THE NEW YORK PUBLIC LIBRARY 40 Dir-Scr Radu Jude. Prod Ada Solomon. Romania 2017. 83min. Prod Co Hi Film Productions WED 11 SAT 14 19:00 NFT3 13:30 MAYFAIR THU 5 FRI 6 18:30 ICA 18:30 RICH MIX MON 9* WED 11 FRI 13 18:15 ICA 20:45 CINÉ LUMIÈRE 13:15 NFT2 SUN 8 MON 9 17:45 VUE7 15:45 NFT3 Dir Shevaun Mizrahi. Prod Shelly Grizim, Deniz Buga. USA-Turkey- Netherlands 2017. 80min. Sales Cinephil Dir-Prod Frederick Wiseman. USA 2017. 197min. Sales Zipporah Films, Doc & Film International A troubled period of Romanian history is brilliantly brought back to life through archive photographs. In Radu Jude’s haunting account of life in provincial Romania in the years leading up to the Second World War, the faces of the people who lived in those times stare at you with startling immediacy: some are smiling, some stern, some obscured by a fascist salute. The Dead Nation is compiled from still images selected from a collection of glass plate photographs taken by a commercial photographer in rural Romania. It’s a rich evocation of the life of a community on the brink of war, underscored by a soundtrack featuring propaganda speeches and extracts from the diary of a Jewish doctor, alert to the coming catastrophe. This is a work of stark power and commanding assurance – a vivid portrait of divided times that speaks to the uncertainties of our own age. Edward Lawrenson In his latest captivating endeavour to explore the great American institutions, legendary documentary filmmaker Frederick Wiseman turns his inquisitive eye to the New York Public Library. It encompasses 92 branches throughout Manhattan, the Bronx and Staten Island, and receives 32 million online visitors annually. NYC’s beloved institution is an incredible resource of knowledge as well as community support for all the city’s inhabitants, no matter their social status or ethnicity. Wiseman goes behind the scenes to record animated board meetings, talks with guest speakers such as Patti Smith and Elvis Costello, book club events and donors’ dinners, as well as the day-to-day activity of lending books. Wiseman’s patient, observational style, combined with his deft editing, draws you into this fascinating world. The result is a thought-provoking love letter to a model of inclusion and knowledge sharing, and a topical reminder of the preciousness of libraries everywhere. Laure Bonville In an Istanbul retirement home, residents reminisce over the past as relentless construction work and constant change takes place outside. In her striking documentary debut, photographer Shevaun Mizrahi sketches a series of charming and idiosyncratic portraits of the residential home’s inhabitants. They include a woman who escaped the Armenian Genocide, a libidinous pianist, a blind photographer who carries his camera everywhere and two men who travel endlessly up and down an elevator. The stories they tell are intensely personal. With an arresting visual style that employs long, beautifully framed takes, Mizrahi’s camera lingers in and around the building, a place where time seems to have stopped. It’s a contrast to life outside, where young men are busy building a new high rise and worrying about the present. Juxtaposing these two distinct worlds, Mizrahi playfully ponders on existential themes, including the unavoidable passage of age and time. Laure Bonville THE DEAD NATION TARA MOARTA DOCUMENTARY COMPETITION DOC DOC DOC Dir-Scr Arash Kamali Sarvestani, Behrouz Boochani. Prod Arash Kamali Sarvestani. Netherlands- Australia-Papua New Guinea 2017. 90min. Prod Co Sarvin Productions An urgent and powerful documentary, shot in a detention centre where asylum seekers trying to reach Australian shores are indefinitely detained. Secretly shot on a mobile phone by Iranian journalist Behrouz Boochani while detained on Manus, in Papua New Guinea, the film is a collaboration with Dutch-Iranian filmmaker Arash Kamali Sarvestani. Boochani recounts, via the testimonies of fellow inmates, the abuse and violence inflicted and the precarious state of limbo they find themselves in. Chauka, the name of the dreaded solitary confinement unit within the detention centre, was originally the name of a beautiful bird and symbol of the Manus Island. By interweaving dialogue with two Manusian men and shots of daily life on the island, the film gives a much-needed voice to Manus inhabitants, understandably distressed by the current situation. With marked restraint, the film exposes lives broken by shocking immigration policies. Laure Bonville @BFI #lff


LFF 17_ Brochure high res
To see the actual publication please follow the link above