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37 FIRST FEATURE COMPETITION I AM NOT A WITCH JEUNE FEMME TUE 10 THU 12 SUN 15 20:45 NFT2 13:15 NFT3 13:00 CINÉ LUMIÈRE MON 9 TUE 10 FRI 13 21:00 SOHO 12:50 NFT3 18:30 HACKNEY SUN 8* MON 9 SUN 15 20:45 MAYFAIR 12:30 VUE5 18:15 SOHO THU 12 SAT 14 SUN 15 21:00 MAYFAIR 14:45 SOHO 12:30 SOHO Dir-Scr Rungano Nyoni. Prod Emily Morgan, Juliette Grandmont, Titus Kreyenberg. With Margaret Mulubwa, Henry Phiri, Nancy Mulilo. UK-France- Zambia 2017. 95min. UK Distribution Curzon Artificial Eye Dir-Scr Léonor Serraille. Prod Sandra da Fonseca. With Laetitia Dosch, Souleymane Seye Ndiaye, Grégoire Monsaingeon. France-Belgium 2017. 97min. UK Distribution Curzon Artificial Eye Dir-Scr Carla Simón. Prod Valerie Delpierre, Stefan Schmitz, Maria Zamora. With Laia Artigas, Bruna Cusi, David Verdaguer. Spain 2017. 96min. Sales New Europe Film Sales In a Zambian village Shula, a small, silent girl with big eyes, is accused of being a witch. Her choice: join a travelling witch camp or become a goat. Thus begins Zambian-born, Wales-raised Rungano Nyoni’s dazzling and audacious satirical fairy tale. Choosing to join the troop, Shula (a startlingly impressive Margaret Mulubwa) is placed onto a flatbed truck alongside witches with long ribbons streaming down their backs, attached to spindles which ensure their captivity. Shula’s big eyes remain inscrutably calm, even when she is subjected to the bizarre absurdities of being a tourist attraction in a travelling freak-show. Nyoni explodes onto the global stage with this thrilling debut and its exhilaratingly cacophonous array of cultural influences. Rooted in an attack on a specific tradition – witch camps – this allegorical tale is also a blistering critique of attitudes to women. And if the details are specific to Africa, its themes are globally resonant. Tricia Tuttle Dir-Scr Ana Asensio. Prod Jenn Wexler, Chadd Harbold, Larry Fessenden, Noah Greenberg, Ana Asensio. With Ana Asensio, Natasha Romanova, Caprice Benedetti. Spain-USA 2017. 80min. UK Distribution Bulldog A day in the life of an undocumented Spanish immigrant in New York is given the Grand Guignol treatment in this darkly compelling debut. Inspired by her own experiences, director-writer-producer Ana Asensio plays Luciana, a Spanish immigrant trying to build a life for herself in the Big Apple. With no social security number and thus no hope of a steady income, Luciana is forced to take work where she can, whether it’s babysitting privileged rich kids on the Upper East Side or sporting a sexy chicken costume to promote a tacky fast food joint. When her Russian friend Olga suggests a highly-paid, no-questions-asked mystery gig, Luciana is in no position to say no. But her concerns soon escalate. A veritable masterclass in mounting tension and insidious discomfort, Asensio expertly utilises genre conventions to heighten her dark – and often painfully sad – parable about exploitation and the American Dream. Michael Blyth When a key doesn’t get Paula into her ex-lover’s apartment, her attempts at head-butting the door open also prove unsuccessful. A bleeding head wound opens this kinetic, urgent portrait of a heartbroken young woman who is her own worst enemy. Hauling the ex’s cat across Paris in a cardboard box, Paula’s days as a photographer’s muse are over. But she does possess a scrappy charisma and this magnetism is her ticket to clawing her way back to stability. Jeune Femme takes its cues from Laetitia Dosch’s impossible-to-take-your-eyes-off-her performance as Paula, hurtling through scenes to a post-punk electro score. Debut director Léonor Serraille impresses with sheer vivacity – this is filmmaking from someone who is alive to both the possibilities of cinema and to human experience in 2017. And it’s a film that is funny, moving and hugely invigorating. Kate Taylor An outstanding debut feature charting the emotional journey of a six-year old girl in the aftermath of her mother’s death in early 1990s Spain. Frida (an extraordinary performance from Laia Artigas) is dealing with a grief she cannot process when she is packed off from her Barcelona home to live with her mother’s brother, his wife and their four-year old daughter in rural Catalonia. However, good intentions don’t always produce the desired result as Frida struggles to settle into a new family dynamic. Spain has produced some of cinema’s most resonant child protagonists and there is something of the spirit of Saura’s Cría Cuervos and Erice’s The Spirit of the Beehive in Carla Simón’s beautifully crafted film. Balancing an acute sense of place and time with a broader autobiographical slant, Summer 1993 is a distinctive film realised with heartfelt sensitivity and a keen sense of visual poetry. Maria Delgado SUMMER 1993 ESTIU 1993 MOST BEAUTIFUL ISLAND BRITISH * BSL


LFF 17_ Brochure high res
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