Page 25

LFF 17_ Brochure high res

25 SPECIAL PRESENTATION IN ASSOCIATION WITH SIGHT & SOUND SPECIAL PRESENTATION TUE 10 WED 11 20:30 EMBANKMENT 11:30 EMBANKMENT Dir-Scr Sally Potter. Prod Christopher Sheppard, Kurban Kassam. With Patricia Clarkson, Bruno Ganz, Cherry Jones, Emily Mortimer, Cillian Murphy, Kristin Scott Thomas, Timothy Spall. UK 2017. 71min. UK Distribution Picturehouse Entertainment SAT 14 SUN 15 18:00 EMBANKMENT 14:00 OLS For her fourth feature, Lucrecia Martel swaps her native Salta for the epic landscape of a late 18th century colonial empire ruled over by a distant Spain. A blistering adaptation of Antonio di Benedetto’s 1956 existential novel, Zama charts the progressive decline of a minor officer and Magistrate of the Spanish Crown. Don Diego de Zama (an extraordinary performance by Daniel Giménez Cacho) is desperate to relocate from his remote regional office to the city where his wife and children live. A letter of recommendation from the Governor, which is required for such moves, seems endlessly postponed and Zama finds himself increasingly side-lined in a world where the Spanish-born élite mismanage the running of their protectorates. Martel’s assured style balances the personal and the political, as Zama’s frustrations and failings are viewed through the prism of the broader canvas of Spain’s imperialist grip across the Americas. With its richly layered sound design, visuals that accentuate the grotesque and absurd, and a narrative whose personal story becomes a microcosm of universal malaise, Zama is an audacious, intense and often disarming experience. This disturbing yet intoxicating cinematic journey takes you deep into the darker recesses of the soul. Maria Delgado SPECIAL PRESENTATIONS ZAMA Dir-Scr Lucrecia Martel. Prod Benjamin Domenech, Vania Catani, Matías Roveda, Santiago Gallelli. With Daniel Giménez Cacho, Lola Dueñas, Matheus Nachtergaele. Argentina-Brazil-Spain- The Netherlands- Mexico-Portugal- USA 2017. 115min. Sales The Match Factory A brilliant ensemble cast get their teeth stuck into Britain’s political elite in Sally Potter’s biting and supremely entertaining satire. Janet (Kristin Scott Thomas) has just been appointed Shadow Minister for Health and has invited some friends around to celebrate. Her dazed husband (Timothy Spall) seems happy enough to see razortongued April (Patricia Clarkson), but struggles to check his intolerance of flagrant new-ager Gottfried (Bruno Ganz). Next to arrive are Martha (Cherry Jones), described by April as ‘a first-class lesbian and a second-rate thinker’, and her wife Jinny (Emily Mortimer), but things seriously derail when unhinged and chemically-enhanced banker Tom (Cillian Murphy) bursts in looking for his wife. Dinner always appears to be on the cusp of being served but never quite arrives. As in Luis Buñuel’s The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie, the guests remain hungry and volatile. The film, however, serves up a full course of character dissections, with Potter’s spit-fire dialogue and Aleksei Rodionov’s prowling camera revealing much more than the individual ambitions and petty grievances of the guests. Written in the lead-up to the 2015 British General Election, Potter’s potent, funny and deliciously nasty film relishes stripping bare characters who fail ‘to keep to their own party-line of what is morally right and politically left’. Clare Stewart THE PARTY BRITISH


LFF 17_ Brochure high res
To see the actual publication please follow the link above