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LFF 17_ Brochure high res

STRAND GALAS FESTIVAL GALA IN ASSOCIATION WITH TIME OUT FRI 13 SAT 14 21:30 OLS 11:30 OLS THE FLORIDA PROJECT 18 DEBATE GALA WED 11 THU 12 17:45 EMBANKMENT 14:30 EMBANKMENT One to savour on the biggest screen, Foxtrot highlights the absurdities of conscripted military service, examines the relationship between a father and his remote son, and sees a couple grapple with every parent’s worst nightmare. Michael and Daphna Feldmann (Lior Ashkenazi and Sarah Adler) have barely begun to accept the horrific news about their son, when they discover that all is not what it seems. Meanwhile, teenage Israeli soldiers fight boredom at a military checkpoint, placing bets on whether their dilapidated barrack is sinking into the mud. After winning Venice’s Golden Lion with his exceptional and controversial Lebanon, Samuel Maoz once again contemplates the reality-altering nature of militarised life. Pulling back from the extreme proximity of his previous film (entirely set within a tank), Maoz adopts a wider perspective with Foxtrot, examining the impact of regimented behaviour – whether it’s an Israeli family living an ordered middle-class city life, young people asked to control who comes and goes at a border, or military personnel blindly following protocol. Amidst this, Maoz reflects on a son’s shifting perception of his father (with Lior Ashkenazi superbly conveying an aging father’s chiselled vulnerability). Giora Bejach’s cinematography finds thrilling ways to convey meaning with every precise shot, ensuring that Foxtrot combines a breathtaking cinematic experience with a resonant reflection on modern Israeli life. Tricia Tuttle FOXTROT Dir-Scr Samuel Maoz. Prod Michael Weber, Viola Fügen, Eitan Mansuri, Cedomir Kolar, Marc Baschet, Michel Merkt. With Sarah Adler, Lior Ashkenazi. Germany-Israel-France 2017. 113min. Sales The Match Factory Dir Sean Baker. Prod Sean Baker, Chris Bergoch, Shih-Ching Tsou, Andrew Duncan, Alex Saks, Kevin Chinoy, Francesca Silvestri. Scr Sean Baker, Chris Bergoch. With Willem Dafoe, Brooklynn Kimberly Prince, Bria Vinaite,  Valeria Cotto, Christopher Rivera, Caleb Landry Jones. USA 2017. 115min. UK Distribution Altitude Film Distribution That The Little Rascals is an inspiration for Sean Baker’s magical, magnificent and madcap follow-up to Tangerine (LFF2015) makes perfect sense when you see this story of childhood, set against the backdrop of America’s failed economy. Six-year-old Moonee (the astonishingly good Brooklynn Kimberly Prince) lives with her mother and other castaways from the American dream in a candy-floss-coloured roadside motel in Orlando. Disney World is just up the road, but their budget dayglow home is no plush hotel resort. Halley, Moonee’s mother, is only just an adult herself. More of an incorrigible older sister than a parent, she gets a kick out of juvenile hijinks, with utter disregard for their consequences. Meanwhile, nothing stops her daughter’s irrepressible sense of adventure; always unsupervised, Moonee roams the grounds with her gang, hustling change for ice creams, hosting spitting contests and teasing tolerant motel manager Bobby (a sublime Willem Dafoe) to distraction. The genius of Baker’s film is how it runs along two parallel tracks. Narrated from a child’s-eye view, this is a marvellous world of play and possibility. But adult viewers witnessing Halley’s life will suspect what’s coming for Moonee. That this dazzling, precocious girl is a lightning rod of wayward charm makes the inevitable so much harder to bear. The Florida Project is an ingenious, instant classic about childhood innocence. Tricia Tuttle @BFI #lff


LFF 17_ Brochure high res
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