Big Screen Classics

BFI Southbank Guide Oct-Nov 2017

BIG SCREEN CLASSICS The timeless films we urge you to see A Matter of Time Because cinema involves moving pictures and editing, it’s a medium inextricably linked with time, which it depicts and distorts but also contains. Until the end of the year, our daily screenings of classic movies will be looking at films that explore time, express time, play with time, take time as their subject in one way or another – and, we hope, give you a good time. Geoff Andrew, Programmer-at-large BIG SCREEN CLASSICS 56 book online at bfi.org.uk Tickets for these screenings are only £8 WED 18 OCT SUN 22 OCT SUN 26 NOV 18:30 NFT3* 18:00 STUDIO 20:00 STUDIO SUN 5 NOV TUE 7 NOV 16:00 NFT1 18:30 NFT2 MON 23 OCT THU 26 OCT SAT 25 NOV 20:50 NFT3 20:50 NFT1 20:50 STUDIO Man with a Movie Camera + intro by Geoff Andrew, Programmer-at-large* Chelovek s kinoapparatom Soviet Union 1929. Dir Dziga Vertov. 68min. Digital. EST. U. With the Alloy Orchestra score. With Live piano accompaniment.* Constructed as a day in the life of a typical Soviet city, Vertov’s exhilarating docu-fiction is also a highly illuminating analysis of the relationship between film, reality and history. As such, his radical use of montage makes ingenious play with time, both acknowledging and revelling in its own brilliantly inventive artifice. Seldom was Soviet cinema so witty and fresh. The Cameraman USA 1928. Dir Edward Sedgwick. With Buster Keaton, Marceline Day, Harry Gribbon. c70min. 35mm. U. With live piano accompaniment. A year before Vertov’s Man with a Movie Camera, Keaton – who’d already investigated the effects of editing in Sherlock Junior – explored the gulf between reality and its representation on film in this wonderfully funny tale of a newsreel cameraman’s forlorn attempts to impress a girl. The film-within-a-film sequences are remarkably imaginative and meticulously executed. Rashomon Japan 1950. Dir Akira Kurosawa. With Toshiro Mifune, Machiko Kyo, Takashi Shimura, Masayuki Mori. 88min. Digital. EST. 12A Kurosawa’s landmark movie, set in 12th-century Kyoto, is rightly famous for its innovative narrative structure; it depicts an ambush, rape and murder four times, each different version reflecting (or does it?) the viewpoint of one of those involved. While making for vital, affecting drama, this compare- and-contrast approach constitutes a contemplation of subjectivity and the fallibility of absolute truth. INTRO


BFI Southbank Guide Oct-Nov 2017
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