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BFI SB Guide May Page Turner

BRITISH WOMEN WWII CINEMA and ‘I’VE GOT TO HAVE A BABY OR GO INTO A FACTORY? WHAT AM I TO DO?’ GREAT DAY In the second part of our season, we feature more writers: Diana Morgan (Go To Blazes), Dorothy Hope and Katherine Strueby (Candlelight In Algeria, Tomorrow We Live), Pamela Bower (Yellow Canary), Lesley Storm (Great Day), and female directors and actors come to the fore, says season curator and Their Finest producer Stephen Woolley In a 1938 survey of cinemagoers, American actors dominated the popularity polls. But with the success of British propaganda cinema and its emphasis on female-led stories, in 1946 the stars of Margaret Lockwood, Anna Neagle and Deborah Kerr shone as brightly as those of Ingrid Bergman and Bette Davis. As the Ministry of Information (MOI) continued to reach out to a female audience, more women were given the chance to direct informationals. We also focus on three Powell and Pressburger films that embraced the MOI ethos and highlighted new roles for female actors thereafter commonly portrayed during the war: the European resistance fighter (One of Our Airplanes is Missing), the Women’s Land Army Worker (A Canterbury Tale) and an Auxiliary Territorial Service officer’s driver (The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp). WANT MORE? See p8 for screenings of Their Finest Images: Millions Like Us, The Gentle Sex IN PARTNERSHIP WITH


BFI SB Guide May Page Turner
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