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BFI SB Guide May Page Turner

‘THE MORE REAL THINGS GET, THE MORE LIKE MYTHS THEY BECOME’ RAINER WERNER FASSBINDER Part two of this survey shows post-war Germany’s most provocative filmmaker at the height of his powers, writes season programmer Margaret Deriaz Fassbinder always dreamed of creating his own brand of ‘German Hollywood film’, and with The Marriage of Maria Braun (1978), he finally managed to combine huge popular appeal with a complex, uncompromising vision of reality. This was the first of three superbly crafted chronicles of the 1950s (the others were Lola and Veronika Voss) – antidotes to the prevailing historical amnesia. By exploring the past, Fassbinder aimed to shed light on Germany’s troubled present; in other works, he engaged directly with the political turmoil and terrorism of the 1970s. ‘The secret of our success is that we’re making honest films,’ he once said, but his fierce integrity made him a target of vicious abuse. Neither a polemicist nor an ideologue (he dubbed himself a ‘romantic anarchist’), Fassbinder remains an extraordinary artist whose passion for truth-telling is now more important than ever. WANT MORE? See p46 for our Big Screen Classics: Fassbinder’s Favourites See p58 for Future Film Recommends See p24 for a Philosophical Screens event See p24 for The Bitter Tears of Fassbinder’s Women: A Symposium In collaboration with: Rainer Werner Fassbinder image courtesy of Deutsches Filminstitut, Frankfurt / Sammlung Peter Gauhe Film images: The Bitter Tears of Petra von Kant, Martha, Beware of a Holy Whore, Fox and His Friends, Effi Briest, Love Is Colder Than Death, The Marriage of Maria Braun, The Merchant of Four Seasons, World on a Wire


BFI SB Guide May Page Turner
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