Page 48

SBW Issue 11 Jeneth Blackert

Books That Make Us Unstoppable The Entrepreneur Mind More motivational (to me at least) is #90, which suggests that one should not simply enter business because one can’t be disciplined. Considering how many claim to be entrepreneurs simply to fritter away without a strict regimen, I found Johnson’s advice to be highly apt for younger entrepreneurs. Johnson’s next suggestion, to look up enterprising ancestors, appears somewhat eccentric, though he makes up for it by adding #92 – knowing one’s true worth. Thereafter we get sections on being passionate, being emotional and against the inherent ageism in entrepreneurship. Johnson finishes off the book by adding that an entrepreneur can’t keep a job (dubious advice methinks), and having the entrepreneurial spirit forever. As this lengthy review would suggest, I have been forced to leave out some of the more unremarkable points, and this may make my judgment seem biased against the author. Indeed, some of the points which I found in the book are those which are either not mentioned directly, or not emphasized enough. Some, like finding an enemy, might seem a bit too aggressive, but the inner motivating factor should not be overlooked. Indeed, simple as this book is, it nevertheless works on different layers, and must not be taken at face value at all times. 48 | SavvyBizWomen Nevertheless, the book does have its fair share of faults. Advice is often scattered and threads are hard to pick up. Some advice is plain cliché, and tends to make one fast forward through the pages. References to the author’s wife and ex are, as noted, not very savory, and though not shocking, tend to glorify the workaholic a tad too much while characterizing near and dear ones as lacking compassion and being overbearing. Finally, some advice counteracts others, and adds to the confusion. The Entrepreneurial Mind is perhaps the best book in this category of books, which claim to offer a lot of advice in few pages. Easy as it would be to lambast the book for its faults, one has to appreciate the good points as well. Perhaps what makes this book a great read is Johnson’s own experiences, which though excessive and unpleasant at times, add real value to the book. Coupled with some of the original research and innovative thoughts, these ensure that the reader does not have to swim through moth-eaten advice for long, even when the advice isn’t exactly new. All in all, when read with a slightly heavy pinch of salt, this book can be a good guide to the budding, or even the established entrepreneur. Aritra Majumdar is a blogger, bookworm, history buff and a tech enthusiast who likes to devote his spare time to reading books and keeping abreast of the latest in the worlds of literature and technology.


SBW Issue 11 Jeneth Blackert
To see the actual publication please follow the link above