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Upstate Spring 14 Magazine Online

question of ‘Do you want to go. It was always ‘You’re going to college,’” Bottsford said. She said USC Spartanburg played a huge role in her life during that time and in her future. It’s also the reason that she’s stayed actively involved in the life of the campus by serving on the Spartanburg County Commission for Higher Education and on the advisory board for the Mary Black School of Nursing. A graduate of Chapman High School, Bottsford said she was still reeling from the death of her mother when it came time to look at colleges. “My guidance counselor, Mrs. Nicholson, told me that I wasn’t ready to go away to college and that perhaps, I should consider USC Spartanburg,” Bottsford noted. “My mother was critically ill during my junior year of high school, and I was still too emotionally attached to try and leave home for school.” Bottsford said when she received her acceptance letter, she immediately woke her father up early before his shift at the mill. “He was so proud of me,” Bottsford recalled. Choosing to be a nurse was a decision that came easily for Bottsford. While spending time with her mother at St. Luke’s Hospital in Columbus, N.C., for intravenous treatments, a nurse told her that she should consider nursing as an occupation. Bottsford said she told the nurse that she had heard she would need to study two years of Latin. The nurse told her, "you just need to care." Bottsford began the two-year nursing program at USC Spartanburg. She said the students were close and they faced a lot of scrutiny from hospital staff, especially since the nursing students lived in the nurse’s residence. “Any time that something went wrong in the hospital, they would say ‘the branch girls did it,’” Bottsford said. “They were very accepting of us and our pranks.” She said the group loved to play jokes on one another, like wrapping toilet seats with cellophane, and on one occasion draping a skeleton from a second floor window of the residence. “We would get the reminder, ‘girls, the emergency department looks out at your building,’” she said. Bottsford said she will forever be grateful for the visionaries who started USC Spartanburg. “Because someone stepped up, I’ve had a wonderful career in nursing,” Bottsford said. “I look back at what USC Upstate has become with great pride. As I sit on the platform with members of the Commission during graduation, I always look out at those young people and think, that was me almost 50 years ago.” HELP US BRING TO LIFE THE HISTORY YOU MADE USC Upstate will celebrate its 50th anniversary in 2017. As plans are being developed and the celebration is being planned, the University hopes to reconnect with members of the class of 1967 or 1968. We’d love to hear about your experiences or remembrances of your first years in college… • What led you to attend USC Spartanburg? • How did the opening of this college impact your life? • Who were some of your most memorable professors? • What made your first year(s) so special? • Is there a particularly interesting moment that stands out as an all-time favorite of your first year(s)? Of course, we want photos, too! Images of those early years are hard to come by, so let us know if you have any we can scan and use. We look forward to hearing from you and bringing to life the incredible history that you helped make. Please contact : Meg Hunt at mhunt@uscupstate.edu or Carolyn Farr Shanesy at cfarr-shanesy@uscupstate.edu 7  7   2014 Spring Upstate Magazine


Upstate Spring 14 Magazine Online
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