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Compass binnacle made by Iver Weilbach & Co, instrument makers of Copenhagen. A non magnetic stand houses the compass and is mounted on gimbals. The balls on each side are correction balls which are moved in or out to correct the compass direction by counteracting the ship’s magnetic fi eld. The two canisters at the top contain lights to allow the compass to be used at night. returns in the salvage industry this representative tried to put fi nancial pressure on SVITZER. Failing to do so the representative opted to resign, which effectively broke up the arbitration. In the end SVITZER and a number of Norwegian salvage companies merged their Norwegian activities in the limited company, Norsk Bjergningskompagni A/S, in 1912. Emotions such as those adding to the dispute between SVITZER and the Norwegian competitors could at times run high, as witnessed by the article below from the left-wing newspaper Socialdemokraten: “The Danish state spends millions every year ensuring safe navigation… but when a ship is grounded, the state steps back and leaves the ship to the monopolized plunder of a bunch of capitalists. Svitzer’s salvage vessels hurry to the site, latch onto the hull and suck out the last drop without the world knowing anything, since the shipping companies pay without a murmur. Now and then a shipping company gasps and quietly breaks down. Svitzer has drained the blood from its heart! There is only one way to prevent this robbery, this monopolized ruthless exploitation: the state must take over the salvage business. The piracy of Svitzer does not belong to civilization and is a disgrace to the country.” SOCIALDEMOKRATEN, 1911 However, the right-wing newspaper Berlingske Tidende expressed a somewhat different view of the work performed by SVITZER and the salvage industry: “For 82 years now the company has run its business in honour of the Danish fl ag and to the most undisputed benefi t of the nation and the people. Its name is known all over the globe: it has brought and still is bringing large amounts of foreign capital into the country and it provides jobs for many Danish citizens, while at the same time securing a good income for poor fi shermen living on our coasts. Its activity contributes considerably to providing work for Danish shipyards and shipbuilders with repairs on wrecked ships and so on. In the artifi cially created agitation there is not stated one truthful or even fairly reliable example that a grounded ship was left without opportune help due to the existing contract relations between the business and the people living on the coast.” BERLINGSKE TIDENDE, 1911 S V I T Z E R – S A F E T Y A N D S U P P O R T AT S E A 31


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