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Copenhagen. This base was strategic. Vessels to and from the Baltic Sea had to sail through the Sound in order to reach Copenhagen or continue into the Kattegat and this part of the Sound was known for its diffi cult waters. The terms of a salvage contract were negotiated between the captain of the ship and the salvage master. It was therefore crucial for the salvage company to be at the right location at the right time and for the salvage master to be able to make a quick and realistic assessment of the job to be done. This included estimating the value of the vessel and cargo and of course the work, equipment and manpower required to get the vessel safely to port. The gig was generally used to reach people quickly and transport the salvors between the shore and the casualty. The sprit-sailed rigged boat was used for drains or kedges while the cutter was used to lift, transfer cargo and tow. With its fl at bottom, the cutter was ideal for salvage as it was possible to get close to the grounded vessels. The cutter also carried the necessary salvage equipment which mainly consisted of lifting gear, winches and later steam pumps. A painting of the bridge Toldbodsbroen in Copenhagen showing the busy port entrance in the background. The painting is from around 1820 by H.G.F. Holm. In the 1820s Denmark saw an increase in shipping, particularly export of grain to England. In 1823 just 28 ships arrived in Britain under the Danish fl ag, in 1824 the number was 265 and in 1826 it had risen to 736. S V I T Z E R – S A F E T Y A N D S U P P O R T AT S E A 13


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