Page 30

HRMR Annual 2016-17

Datix This is not to say that individuals are not responsible for their actions or inactions or should not be held accountable. Rather, that there are numerous, confounding, and overlapping contributing factors governing human behavior that collectively result in causality. Only by identifying these human factors will �������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� Leaders and managers need to understand this and to support robust, intellectually succinct and unbiased investigations. We need to do a much better job, and the patients we are privileged to serve are waiting and watching. CASE STUDY A morbidly obese patient was admitted for a cholecystectomy. Since the surgery was complicated by access problems related to the patient’s obesity, the surgeon converted the planned laparoscopic procedure to an open cholecystectomy. At ���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� Post-operatively, the patient complained of mild abdominal pain, some nausea and anorexia. After three days, she was discharged home. Her exam at discharge, as reported in the surgeon’s discharge note, revealed mild abdominal tenderness, attributed to incisional pain. She was advised to call for any problems and to return for a surgical outpatient appointment in one week. Thirty-six hours after discharge the patient became suddenly unresponsive, having developed a distended abdomen over several hours. She was readmitted urgently with a diagnosis of bowel perforation and abdominal sepsis. Despite operative intervention and intensive support, she died 48 hours after readmission. �������� ������������������ �������������������� ���� ���������� ������������ �������������������� �������� �������� ���������������� concluded that this “unfortunate incident” was primarily related to the possible bowel perforation, a known complication of surgery. The surgeon had acted in good faith. �������� �������������������� �������������� ���������� ���� ������������������������ �������������� �������� ���� �������������� investigation, by an outside surgical consultant, was conducted as part of the hospital’s risk management process. This investigation noted that the patient’s vital signs post-operatively had revealed a slow, yet consistently increasing temperature and pulse and slowly decreasing blood pressure. On the morning of discharge, the patient had complained of anorexia ������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������oC. ������������������������������������������������������������������������ ���������������������������������������������������������������� ���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� ���������� ������������������������ ���� �� ������������������ �������� ������������������ ������ ������������������ �������������� ���������� suggested to the surgeon that the patient had emerging abdominal sepsis related to bowel perforation. This patient’s bowel perforation was a treatable condition and her septic death was possibly preventable. The patient died because the 30 “If the healthcare industry is to emulate the characteristics of higher reliability industries then it, and we, must diligently strive to learn from investigations of safety incidents.” surgeon failed to pay attention to objective signs of evolving infection. The surgeon was responsible and accountable for what had happened. If this were the end of the story, and the “root cause” was the surgeon’s inattention to details, then few opportunities for learning would have �������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� ���������������������� When the surgeon was interviewed as part of a subsequent professional ������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ have contributed to his inattention to detail. The surgeon had been �������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� his partner had become suddenly ill. The surgeon had taken an additional consecutive night on call that evening as a result of his partner’s illness and had been up until 4am with an urgent surgical case. He had had two hours of sleep prior to making ward rounds on the day of discharge and was due to travel that day to visit his elderly father, recently diagnosed with acute leukemia, but had not yet had a chance to �������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� emotionally distressed and rushed. Yes, the surgeon was responsible for the care of this patient. Yes, he was accountable for what happened. Yes, he made mistakes, but human beings make mistakes. He was faced with compelling circumstances �������������������������������������������������������������������������� ������������������������������������������������������������������ degraded his performance. His mistake, though deeply regrettable, was ���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� but not subjected to professional sanctions and was referred for ���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� ������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ CONCLUSION Only by improving the quality of investigations can real opportunities ���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� developed, put in place and sustained. Investigations must be thorough and must be competently performed, using the right people in the right settings in the right timeframes, and by valuing the contributions of those �������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� Placing a high value on incident reporting and enhancing the quality of investigations by delving deeply to identify contributing factors are fundamental pillars of the high reliability culture that the healthcare ������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ is a key responsibility of leadership. �� �������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� ���������������������������������������������� | HEALTHCARE RISK MANAGEMENT REVIEW | Annual 2016 NETKOFF / SHUTTERSTOCK.COM


HRMR Annual 2016-17
To see the actual publication please follow the link above