Page 29

HRMR Annual 2016-17

the healthcare industry is to emulate the characteristics of higher reliability industries then it, and we, must diligently strive to learn from investigations of safety incidents. We must identify the system and process errors and human mistakes that result in injuries and deaths, and we must do so in a systematic fashion that leads to actionable improvements in the provision of healthcare services and thus in patient safety. In other words, we must put into action the improvement opportunities we identify from our ���������������������������������������������������������������������������� Sadly, more often than we would presume, so-called “root cause” analyses are inadequate. They regularly focus on the performance of individuals in “blame and shame” fashion instead of truly understanding the complexities of contributing factors that result in causality at the tip of the needle. Clinicians do not wake up in the morning intending to harm patients, so when harm occurs, we must dissect the reasons for this ������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ IMPROVING INCIDENT INVESTIGATIONS IN HEALTHCARE ������������������ ������������������������ ���������������� ���������� ���������� ���������� ������ ������������������������ ���������������� safety incidents in healthcare, attempts to standardize processes of “root cause” analyses have been inconsistently utilized and applied. In too many instances, investigative teams have been under-resourced, team leaders have lacked authority and collaborative leadership skills, an assumption has been made that all clinicians have suitable skills to conduct investigations, and investigation teams frequently have not included important subject matter experts who can bring new perspectives into discussions. Fortunately, new ���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� ���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� ������������������������������ for learning and putting improvements into place is a key to these strategies. ������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ ������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ case. If one pulls a dandelion out of the ground, one immediately appreciates that the long root has numerous rootlets extending outward. In healthcare, especially in the realm of human error, more often than not there are numerous rootlets, or contributing factors that collectively result in causality. Unless investigations delve deeply to locate the contributing factors ������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ ���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� ������������������������������������������������������ will result from the investigation. ���� �� �������� ���������������� ���� �� ������ ������������������������������ �������� ������������ �������������� ������������������������ ������ that Dr. Smith or Nurse Jones made an error, a mistake in judgment or performance, then the result of that investigation has been to assign blame, not to improve healthcare and reduce risk. In my view, if the result of an investigation has assigned “root” causality to an individual, then that investigation has not delved deeply enough to identify the ������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ collectively result in causality. Annual 2016 | HEALTHCARE RISK MANAGEMENT REVIEW | 29 IGORSTEVANOVIC / SHUTTERSTOCK.COM Risk management professionals, and in my view everyone involved in providing healthcare, should be considered a risk management professional; all have enormous challenges to overcome. Injuries and deaths related to receiving healthcare ������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ lacking to me is a sense of collective professional urgency about this. There is too much complacency among our ranks, with risk management viewed by many healthcare professionals as the responsibility of a small cadre of ���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� The latest studies regarding deaths related to healthcare reveal that over 250,000 people die in America every year due to engagement with the healthcare industry, not because of underlying illnesses but rather as the result ���� �� �������������� �������� ���������������� �������������������������������� �������� ������������ ���������������� ���������� �������������� ���� �� magnitude more are harmed, often seriously harmed, and some are damaged �������������������������� �������� ���������������� �������� ������������������ �������� �������������� ���� �������������� �������������� �������������� ���� ������������������������������������������������������������ �������������������������������������������������������������������������� ������������ ���������������������������������������������������������������������������������� ������������������������������������������������������������������������������ ������������������������ �������������������������������������� ���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� the lives of thousands of mothers, fathers, grandmothers, grandfathers, children, sons, daughters, friends and lovers, even enemies. If that were not enough, there is a risk that the situation may get even worse if projections of the impact of illness burden and complexity related to the pernicious and insidious overweight and obesity endemic are to be considered. The clock is ticking and inertia prevails in far too many settings. There have been some notable improvements in patient safety and risk reduction through standardization of processes, the implementation and utilization of evidence-based checklists for the performance of procedures and caring for patients, and enhancing communication skills. Yet enormous challenges persist, especially in the realm of diagnostic errors, all of which represent delays in accurate diagnoses and provision of correct and appropriate therapies. We have much to learn and much to do, and in my ���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� HIGHER RELIABILITY AND WHY RIGOROUS INVESTIGATION MATTERS Quintessential characteristics of higher reliability industries are the principles of risk anticipation, cultural risk awareness and commitments �������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� performance factors that can result in harm and even death. To achieve highest quality in healthcare we must strive to embed these same characteristics, supplemented by understanding the inherent contributions and interactions of structures and processes that must align to achieving best outcomes. It is only by truly delving deeply into �������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� Unfortunately, even that might not be enough because in healthcare, all too often, actionable improvements are not realized from investigations. Too frequently, improvement processes are not put into place and even when they are, they may not be sustained. Fundamentally, if


HRMR Annual 2016-17
To see the actual publication please follow the link above