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Ford Racing Catalogue Web

ENGINE HISTORY 5.0L DOHC 4V “Ti-VCT” ENGINE Several major Modular 4V upgrades programs 2011-2013 MY5.0L 4 VALVE V8 ENGINE were initiated starting in the late ’90s, but then shelved. Major issues were high costs of implementing a new design, while existing V8s were enjoying high demand. As a result, other strategies for fuel economy and performance improvement were prioritized, such as 6-speed automatic transmissions. By mid-2007, these factors had changed. With lower demand for large SUVs, modern V8 manufacturing capacity was idled and available for conversion to a new design. In addition, Mustang needed a competitive, affordable, and efficient response to new Chevrolet and Dodge pony cars, which would offer V8s a third larger than the 4.6L. And Ford’s new strategy for fuel economy leadership meant F-150 needed a reduced displacement line-up, plus aluminum blocks to spearhead major vehicle weight reductions. The response was internally code named “Coyote,” an homage to the historic high-output V8s campaigned by A.J. Foyt. The 4.6L architecture supported increasing bore from 90.2 to 92.2 and stroke from 90 to 92.8, technology and challenging former Modular independent variable camshaft timing (Ti-VCT) while retaining the basic architecture (e.g., bore design constraints. Airflow improvements began allowed separate phasing adjustment of intake spacing, block deck height, bearing sizes) that with major cylinder head port improvements. and exhaust cams, for smooth idle and fuel enabled major machining and assembly line While prior Modular V8s required access to head economy, but available quick response at high re-use. The power increase from the resulting bolts with camshafts and valvetrain pre- rpm. The Borg-Warner® cam-torque-actuated 4951cc displacement alone would be only about assembled to the cylinder head, the 5.0L moved VCT phasers borrowed components and 25 horsepower, so to reach the Mustang’s 400 camshafts over the head bolts, creating more concepts from both the new 6.2L V8 and latest horsepower target, specific output would also room for optimal intake and exhaust ports. 3.0L V6, with reduced complexity compared to need to leap — from less than 70 hp per liter, to Compact roller finger followers and hydraulic prior oil-pressure actuated designs. Throttle over 80. lash adjustors, supplied by INA, were another body position and intake airflow was optimized Major airflow improvements were the focus for enabler for optimized parts and increased valve by moving the alternator down from the block power-density gains, both leveraging new lift (12 mm intake, 11 mm exhaust). Twin- valley to the side of the block, all enabled by For important information about the proper usage of performance parts, please see page 14. 90 Techline (800) FORD788 See pages 286-292 for important safety, emissions and warranty information.


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